CCWC Announces First Executive Director

Home|News|CCWC Announces First Executive Director

MEDIA CONTACT:
Jeffrey Kraus
Asst. Vice Chancellor for Public Relations
jkraus@vccs.edu
(804) 592-6767

 

RICHMOND — The new Community College Workforce Cooperative (CCWC), in selecting its inaugural executive director, is choosing an individual whose career exemplifies the connections between higher education, workforce training, and large-scale industries that the CCWC aims to create and foster throughout Hampton Roads.

Image of Todd Estes

Estes

Todd Estes has been named to the position after a six-month competitive search. Estes is a graduate of the Newport News Shipbuilding Apprentice School, Old Dominion University, and the College of William & Mary. He is also a former associate vice president at Tidewater Community College. He comes to the CCWC after two years at the System Office of Virginia’s Community Colleges, where created and managed career education programs across Virginia to address business needs in high-demand fields.

“We had an incredible pool of candidates for this job, and that makes sense because it’s an exciting opportunity, “said Dan Lufkin, president of Camp Community College. “However, Todd offers a unique blend of skills, experience, and familiarity with the Hampton Roads region and its industries that was simply unmatched. He’s got a big job ahead of him, and we’re confident that Todd will deliver results.”

Announced at the end of last year, the new Community College Workforce Cooperative (CCWC) will create a single point of contact to access the workforce training resources of Camp, Thomas Nelson, and Tidewater community colleges which together serve 11 cities and four counties through 10 college locations.

The CCWC will coordinate the job training resources, leveraging facilities, labs, and additional training resources of all three community colleges to address the sizeable training needs that exist today in industries like shipbuilding and ship repair. That centralized coordination means those needs will be addressed faster and more cost-effectively. The CCWC will also ensure that the colleges are better prepared to meet emerging trends in the region, like the growing alternative energy industry.

“I’m proud to call Hampton Roads home and to raise my family here,” said Estes. “And I’m excited by the opportunities that I see throughout the region. This pandemic has left a lot of people struggling, asking what’s next for them and their families. Meanwhile, we have businesses that are national, and even global, leaders seeking the workers they need to reach the next level. Our community colleges can bring those people together and that work begins immediately.”

Estes will be responsible for not only beginning the cooperative, but quickly building relationships with chambers of commerce, business and industry groups, economic development officials, elected leaders, and other workforce development officials essential to CCWC’s success while working with existing college workforce leaders. He can be reached at mestes@ccwc.vccs.edu.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 271,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

About Camp Community College: Camp serves the cities of Franklin and Suffolk and the counties of Isle of Wight and Southampton. Since the college’s 1971 founding, nearly 50,000 Virginian’s have taken classes at Camp Community College, which has awarded more than 4,500 academic credentials and trained more than 44,500 individuals through workforce development.

About Thomas Nelson Community College: Founded in 1968, TNCC is an accredited, two-year institution of higher education established as a part of a statewide system of community colleges. The college primarily serves the residents of the cities of Hampton, Newport News, Poquoson, and Williamsburg, and the counties of James City and York. In the 2018-2019 academic year, TNCC served 11,588 students in credit instruction, making it the fifth largest college within the Virginia Community College System in terms of headcount.

About Tidewater Community College: As a part of Virginia’s Community College System, TCC serves the 1.1 million residents of the South Hampton Roads area with four fully comprehensive campuses and five regional centers. As the second largest community college in Virginia, TCC enrolls more than 32,000 students. Founded in 1968, the college is the largest provider of higher education and workforce development training and services in the region.

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