Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2017

1.  Not starting at one of Virginia’s Community Colleges: Tuition and fees at Virginia’s Community Colleges are 1/3 less than Virginia’s public four-year universities. Students who first complete their community college associate degree save as much as $45,000 on the cost of earning a bachelor’s degree when they transfer to one of Virginia’s public four-year colleges and universities.

2. Not Applying for Financial Aid Early: Although students can submit their FAFSA forms anytime between Oct. 1 and Jun. 30, it is best to file early because financial aid is distributed on a first-come, first-serve basis! Contact your college’s admissions or financial aid office for more info.

3. Not Pursuing Scholarship Funds: In addition to federal financial aid, students may also be eligible for a host of college scholarships that will lower the cost of college. Talk to your guidance counselor, college admissions/financial aid office, employer, or any professional and social organizations to which you belong to see what college money is available.

4. Not Taking Advantage of Transfer Grant Funds: Through Virginia’s College Transfer Grant Program (CTG), qualifying students who complete their associate degree at a Virginia two-year public college and then transfer to a participating Virginia four-year college or university may receive up to $3,000 annually to help defray costs!

5. Borrowing Too Much Money: Unlike financial aid or scholarships, student loans must be repaid, with interest! Why not earn an associate degree at one of Virginia’s 23 community colleges, then transfer to a four-year school to pursue a bachelor’s degree? You’ll save thousands, and along the way, financial aid and scholarship money can help you avoid taking on unnecessary debt.

info@vccs.edu'

Virginia's Community Colleges

Created more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve about 400,000 students a year in credit and workforce courses.

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