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Funds to support workforce development at seven community colleges in rural areas

Weyers Cave, Va. – The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE) has received a major financial grant of $500,000 from the Dominion Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Dominion Resources, to benefit the VFCCE’s Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative (RVHI).

The announcement was made today during a special event held in the Robert E. Plecker Workforce Center at Blue Ridge Community College.

The Honorable Gerald L. Baliles, chair of the VFCCE and former governor of Virginia, accepted the presentation check from Paul D. Koonce, executive vice president, Dominion Resources. VFCCE and community college executives at the event were Glenn DuBois, Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges and John Downey, president of Blue Ridge Community College, among others.

“This significant investment from the Dominion Foundation will be used to further the mission of the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative, which aims to transform Virginia’s rural communities through higher education and 21st Century job skills,” said Baliles. “We are honored to receive this grant that will boost career opportunities and elevate workforce development efforts in the commonwealth for years to come.”

“The Dominion Foundation is dedicated to improving the lives of those in the communities we serve, and what could be more important than helping young adults to achieve their full potential through obtaining an associate’s degree at one of Virginia’s Community Colleges,” said Koonce. “We are very proud to support the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative and its strategies to impact the economic prosperity of Virginia.” 

DuBois added, “Even more valuable than the generous financial support is the vote of confidence from such a major employer for an effort that spans the rural areas of Virginia. Thanks to Dominion, hundreds of young men and women will see their dreams of earning a college credential come true.” 

Named for the horseshoe-shaped arc that is formed when the colleges in rural regions of Virginia are marked on a map, the RVHI has implemented strategies to cut in half the number of residents living within the rural horseshoe who lack a high school diploma or its equivalent and to double the percentage of those in rural areas who hold post-secondary credentials.

One of those initiatives involves engaging community college employees called Career Coaches to help local high school students build and pursue college and career plans while still in high school. Another program, the GED Initiative, incentivizes high school dropouts to return for their GED with the knowledge that a community college scholarship is waiting for them upon completion of the GED.

Seven of Virginia’s 14 rural community colleges are engaged in the RVHI’s initial pilot. Those colleges will immediately benefit from the Dominion investment. They include:  Blue Ridge Community College in Weyers Cave; Dabney S. Lancaster Community College in Clifton Forge; Danville Community College; Eastern Shore Community College in Melfa; New River Community College in Dublin; Patrick Henry Community College in Martinsville; and Paul D. Camp Community College in Franklin.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education:  Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college.  The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students; helping more Virginia foster youth pursue and complete higher education through its Great Expectations program; and leading a partnership to improve rural Virginia’s education pipeline through the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative.  For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/Foundation.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit myfuture.vccs.edu.

Dominion (NYSE: D), is one of the nation’s largest producers and transporters of energy. The Dominion Foundation is dedicated to improving the physical, social and economic well-being of the communities served by Dominion companies. The Foundation supports nonprofit causes that meet basic human needs, protect the environment, support education and promote community vitality. For more information about Dominion, visit www.dom.com.

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Community College Philanthropists Honored with 
2015 Chancellor’s Award for Leadership in Philanthropy

 

Richmond – Leading philanthropists selected by community colleges across the commonwealth were honored this week with the Chancellor’s Award for Leadership in Philanthropy.

Hosted by the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, the 10th annual event honors philanthropists from the statewide foundation and each of Virginia’s 23 community colleges. This year’s class of distinguished philanthropy leaders has contributed a combined total of more than $12 million dollars to Virginia’s Community Colleges.

In her keynote remarks, First Lady Dorothy McAuliffe said, “I applaud you for being recognized today but I challenge you to think of this as a beginning, not an end. Like you, I think our community colleges might just be capable of doing anything. But they cannot do it alone.”

VCCS Chancellor Glenn DuBois said “we pay tribute to fellow Virginians who, through leadership, partnership and wise philanthropy, are helping us address the commonwealth’s unmet needs in higher education and workforce development. These distinguished individuals are sharing with us from their hearts, from their hands, and from their experiences. They give of themselves,” he said.

Tiffany Riggs, who received a Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship last year that honored philanthropy leaders Valley Proteins Inc., said she had no idea how she could ever afford college. “But because of the generosity of all the amazing people in here, that has changed. The scholarship from Wells Fargo has not only helped me pay for my classes this year, but has changed my life.”

PHOTO:  Connie Kincheloe, center front, former State Board and Foundation Board member, was the VFCCE recipient of the Philanthropy award. She is shown here with former Governor Gerald Baliles, current chair of the VFCCE board (far left); VCCS Chancellor Glenn DuBois (left) and members of her family. 

 

Recipients of the 2015 Chancellor’s Award for Leadership in Philanthropy:

Blue Ridge Community College                                                      Mr. and Mrs. John and Cathy Matherly

Central Virginia Community College                                            Georgia-Pacific Big Island Mill

Dabney S. Lancaster Community College                                    Mrs. Blakeslee Nettleton Chase

Danville Community College                                                           J.T. Minnie Maude Charitable Trust

Eastern Shore Community College                                                PNC Bank

Germanna Community College                                                      Mr. Kent D. Farmer

Sargeant Reynolds Community College                                       Mr. and Mrs. Jerry and Mary Owen

John Tyler Community College                                                      Mr. Michael R. White

Lord Fairfax Community College                                                  Dr. Morgan Phenix

Mountain Empire Community College and                                The Estate of Mrs. Carol Phipps Buchanan
Southwest Virginia Community College                                           

New River Community College                                                      The Late Mr. Robert J. Ingram

Northern Virginia Community College                                        Micron Technology

Patrick Henry Community College                                               The Walker Family

Paul D. Camp Community College                                                Franklin Southampton Charities

Piedmont Virginia Community College                                       Dr. Patt Keats

Rappahannock Community College                                             The Wright Family

Southside Virginia Community College                                       R.C. and Viola Hines Scholarship Fund

Thomas Nelson Community College                                            Siemens Corporation

Tidewater Community College                                                      Mrs. Vanessa Christie

Virginia Highlands Community College                                      Appalachian Power Company

Virginia Western Community College                                         The Powell Charitable Foundation

Wytheville Community College                                                     Drs. O.J. Campbell, Dennis R. Throckmorton and Richard G. Copenhaver

Virginia Foundation for Community College Education        Mrs. Connie Kincheloe

 

About the Keynote Speaker: Dorothy McAuliffe has made eliminating childhood hunger and improving access to Virginia’s fresh, locally grown agricultural products a top priority as First Lady of Virginia. She has identified food security and nutrition as necessary elements for educational success and building healthy communities. Mrs. McAuliffe currently serves as chair of the Commonwealth Council on Bridging the Nutritional Divide, which focuses on eliminating hunger, developing local agricultural markets, and promoting community efforts that link locally grown food, education, health and nutrition. She is a graduate of The Catholic University of America, with a bachelor’s degree in political science, and received her J.D. degree from Georgetown University Law Center. She and the Governor are the proud parents of five children.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than a quarter-million credit students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education:  Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students. Donors to the fund are invited to endow a single scholarship in their name and designate it to any of Virginia’s community colleges or regions. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/Foundation.

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RICHMONDDr. Dean E. Sprinkle, of Statesville, North Carolina, will become the next president at Wytheville Community College, announced Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. Sprinkle will begin his new post July 1, replacing retiring president Charlie White.

“Dr Sprinkle will be a tremendous fit for Wytheville Community College,” DuBois said in making the appointment. “He has built an impressive career of academic leadership and I'm looking forward to seeing the next chapter of that unfold here in Virginia.”

Sprinkle is currently senior vice president of instruction at Wilkes Community College in Wilkesboro, NC, a position he has held since 2010. Previously, he was vice president of instruction and student services at Wilkes from 2005-2010 and served as dean of student services 2003-2005 and institutional effectiveness officer 1997-2003.

“I’m very excited to be joining the team at Wytheville Community College,” said Sprinkle, who will be trading one “WCC” for another. “My wife and I are very much looking forward to becoming part of the Wytheville college community. I look forward to forging a good partnership to move the college forward.”

“Dr. Sprinkle will be a great fit,” said Mava Vass, who chairs the Wytheville community college board. “He understands this community. We were very, very pleased with the process and had excellent candidates,” she said.

Sprinkle first joined Wilkes Community College as a counselor in 1992, after having served as staff psychologist for Tri-County Mental Health of Statesville and for Wake County Mental Health in Raleigh.

He holds a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, a master’s in clinical psychology from Western Carolina University, a bachelor’s from North Carolina State University and an associate degree from Lees McRae College in Banner Elk, NC.

 

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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 ~ Ralls currently leads North Carolina Community College System ~ 


RICHMOND
– The next president of Northern Virginia Community College is Dr. Scott Ralls, currently president of the North Carolina Community College System, VCCS Chancellor Glenn DuBois announced today. Ralls will assume his new post in early September, replacing Dr. Robert G. Templin, who retired in February.           

“We are delighted to have Dr. Ralls taking the helm at Northern Virginia, one of the nation’s largest community colleges,” said DuBois in making the announcement. “We expect that he will continue, and enhance, the institution’s traditions of vision, leadership and impact.

“I’ve known Scott Ralls for a long time. His passion, knowledge and leadership are among the reasons the North Carolina Community College System is so highly regarded,” DuBois said.

Ralls has served as CEO of the 58-community-college system in North Carolina since May 2008. Before that, he was president of Craven Community College in New Bern and Havelock, NC from 2002-2008, and he was vice president for economic and workforce development for the North Carolina Community College System from 1999-2000.               

“The Northern Virginia Community College Board is delighted that Dr. Ralls has accepted the presidency,” said college board chair Mike Wooten. “Our community expressed tremendous confidence in his readiness to manage the size, complexity, and diversity of NOVA. He brings a rare blend of tested experience, concern for student success, workforce acumen, and vigor to the presidency of America’s community college. Having worked with diverse student bodies, traveled here and abroad, and studied Japanese, he will relate well to an international learning community that speaks over 100 languages.”              

“I am extremely excited and feel greatly privileged to be joining the team at Northern Virginia Community College,” said Ralls. “NOVA is a national leader in its commitment to student success and plays an integral role in the workforce development it provides to support the region’s vibrant economy. I look forward to working with the NOVA team and community to help build on that great foundation.”              

Before becoming vice president for economic and workforce development in North Carolina, Ralls served in other workforce positions for the North Carolina Community College System, as well as for the North Carolina Department of Commerce and for the U.S. Department of Labor. He holds a doctorate and a master’s degree in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of Maryland-College Park and a bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina.   

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve an estimated 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

About Northern Virginia Community College:  NOVA is the largest educational institution in Virginia and the second-largest community college in the United States, with more than 75,000 students. The college is also one of the most internationally diverse in the nation, with students from more than 180 countries. The college includes six campuses near Washington, DC -- Alexandria, Annandale, Loudoun, Manassas, MEC (Springfield) and Woodbridge.

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RICHMOND – Three of Virginia’s Community Colleges have stepped onto the stage and into the education spotlight. The Office of Professional Development has named all three winners of this year’s Excellence in Education (EIE) Awards.

The EIE awards recognize the enhancement of student success through academic engagement, technology, and innovation.

A total of 26 community college projects were submitted for consideration this year – the most entries in six years. The finalists were introduced during the recent New Horizons Conference in Roanoke, VA; an event that was highlighted by the special appearance of Second Lady and Northern Virginia Community College instructor Dr. Jill Biden.

The list of categories, project titles, key faculty members, and winning colleges appears below:

BEST PRACTICES IN TEACHING FACE-TO-FACE, ONLINE AND STUDENT SUCCESS
Write Here, Write Now: Creating a Culture of Writing at PVCC
Jessica Kingsley, Nicole Oechslin
Piedmont Virginia Community College

IMPROVING STUDENT SUCCESS—INSTITUTIONAL
The Advance College Academy: A Comprehensive Dual Enrollment Partnership
Miles McCrimmon, Hilda Billups, Tracy Green, Tracy Banks
J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College

INNOVATIVE USE OF TECHNOLOGY—FACE-TO-FACE & ONLINE CLASSROOM
Improving Student Engagement Through the Use of Chroma Key/Green Screen Technology
Katrina Wells
Southside Virginia Community College

Dr. Abigail Stonerock, director of faculty development for Virginia’s Community Colleges, says faculty members are breaking down barriers to educational achievement every day using ideas and innovations.

“They are elevating our educational instincts, providing new and innovative ways of approaching college challenges, and they are advancing knowledge in new and exciting ways. That needs to be recognized and celebrated.”

Stonerock adds the EIE awards should also serve to reinforce the notion that Virginia’s Community Colleges are committed to student success.

“It is an opportunity to show Virginia’s educational and business leaders how we are transforming the lives and livelihoods of Virginians, and moving the Commonwealth forward.”

The entire list of this year’s nominees can be found on the New Horizons website.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students each year. For more information, please visit http://www.vccs.edu/


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Virginia’s Community Colleges Hire Dr. William C. Aiken to Serve as Interim President of Paul D. Camp Community College

~ Search for college’s next permanent president postponed ~

RICHMOND — Dr. William C. Aiken will lead Paul D. Camp Community College beginning April 6, 2015. His appointment as the college’s interim president will last for at least one year. Subsequently, a statewide committee is postponing its work to select the next permanent president of the college, which serves the communities of Franklin, Suffolk and Smithfield, Virginia.

Aiken, who retired after working for a dozen years as the president of Sampson Community College, in Clinton, N.C., has also served as the interim president of two other North Carolina institutions: Haywood and Rockingham community colleges. Aiken’s higher education career includes numerous positions at institutions throughout Tennessee and North Carolina, dating back to his first job as a teacher in Athens, T.N. in 1965. He holds a doctorate and master’s degree from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

“Bill Aiken is a proven and seasoned higher education leader and I’m delighted to announce his appointment as the interim president of Paul D. Camp Community College,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “The college is facing a number of serious challenges. Were this college a private enterprise, its financial sustainability would be questionable. Our mission, however, compels us to serve these communities, helping people there find opportunity, and we intend to return the college to a standing where it can do that. In the meantime, it is simply unfair to hand over the college, in its current condition, to a new permanent president. Aiken has experience as both an interim and permanent college president and his accomplishments bode well for leading PDCCC through this transition period.”

“I appreciate this opportunity and look forward to this work,” said Dr. Aiken. “From a preliminary look at the college’s indicators, it is not meeting its potential for the leading role that it can and should play in the community. I’m excited to bring people together in this effort to help the college find its footing.”

A committee, consisting of community college leaders from across Virginia and members of the PDCCC local college board, tasked with finding the college’s next permanent president met in Richmond last week. They agreed with DuBois that naming an interim president is a prudent decision and postponed their work to find the college’s next permanent president.

Aiken replaces Dr. Paul Conco, who announced last October his intention to retire as PDCCC’s president after leading the college for five years. Conco previously served as a vice president at Virginia Highlands Community College, in Abingdon, VA, for nearly a decade.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve nearly 400,000 students a year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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News Release Highlights:

•      Finalists are certified for position of president at Wytheville Community College.

•      Candidates will interview at the college in April; an appointment is expected late next month.

 

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified finalists for the position of president at Wytheville Community College. The four finalists include Dr. Hara D. Charlier, of Abingdon, Virginia; Dr. Michael M. Robinson, of Marion, Virginia; Dr. Mark A. Smith, of Temple, Texas; and Dr. Dean E. Sprinkle, of Statesville, North Carolina.

Dr. Hara D. Charlier is currently vice president of instruction and student services for Virginia Highlands Community College in Abingdon, a position she has held since 2012. Previously she was dean of the life science and human services division and accreditation liaison at Blue Ridge Community College from 2010-2012, and interim vice president of instruction and student services at Blue Ridge 2009-2010. She was dean of life sciences and human services 2008-2009 and assistant professor of biology 2005-2007. She holds a doctorate in community college leadership from Old Dominion University; a master’s degree in microbiology from Miami University and a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University.

Dr. Michael M. Robinson is currently superintendent of Smyth County Public Schools, a position he has held since 2007. Previously he was assistant superintendent for instruction in Smyth County Public Schools 2005-2007, and also served as an adjunct professor at Old Dominion University and at the University of Virginia. He was assistant superintendent for Orange County Public Schools 2003-2005, principal of Prospect Heights Middle School in Orange County 2000-2003, and was assistant principal at Orange County High School and Charlottesville High School. He holds a doctorate in administration and supervision from the University of Virginia, as well as master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Louisiana Tech University.

Dr. Mark A. Smith is currently vice president for educational services and chief academic officer at Temple College in Temple, Texas, a position he has held since 2009. Previously he was interim vice president for educational services 2008-2009 and was associate vice president for distance education from 2006-2010. He served as college director for student affairs and distance learning at Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College in Gulfport, MS 2003-2006, and held additional administrative positions there in distance learning and workforce development. He earned a doctorate from Capella University, and also holds an MBA and bachelor’s degree from William Cary College in Hattiesburg, MS and associate degrees from Fort Steilacoom Community College in Tacoma, Washington and the Community College of the Air Force.

Dr. Dean E. Sprinkle is currently senior vice president of instruction at Wilkes Community College in Wilkesboro, NC, a position he has held since 2010. Previously he was vice president of instruction and student services at Wilkes from 2005-2010 and served as dean of student services 2003-2005 and institutional effectiveness officer 1997-2003. He joined Wilkes as a counselor in 1992, and prior to that served as staff psychologist for Tri-County Mental Health of Statesville and for Wake County Mental Health in Raleigh. He holds a doctorate in curriculum and instruction from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, a master’s in clinical psychology from Western Carolina University, a bachelor’s degree from North Carolina State University and an associate degree from Lees McRae College in Banner Elk, NC.

Candidates will attend college interviews at the community college in April; VCCS Chancellor Glenn DuBois hopes to make the appointment by May 1. The appointee will replace Dr. Charlie White, who retires this year after more than eight years as president at WCC and more than 40 years with the Virginia Community College System.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges will convene its regular meeting on Thursday, March 19, at 9 a.m. in the Great Hall of the Workforce Development Center at Eastern Shore Community College, 29300 Lankford Highway, Melfa, Virginia, 23410.

State Board Committees will meet on Wednesday, March 18, also at the Eastern Shore Workforce Development Center. The Academic, Student Affairs and Workforce Development Committee and the Budget and Finance Committee meet at 1:30 p.m.; the Facilities Committee and the Personnel Committee meet at 3 p.m.; and the Audit Committee meets at 3:30 p.m. An Executive Committee meeting will take place on March 18 at the conclusion of all other committee meetings.

As part of the Personnel Committee, finalists for the presidency at Wytheville Community College will be certified.

Public comment will be received at each regular meeting of the board following the approval of minutes. Persons desiring to comment must notify the Chancellor’s Office in advance as specified by the VCCS Policy Manual.

A complete agenda for the State Board meeting is available at: http://www.boarddocs.com/va/vccs/Board.nsf/Public.

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RICHMOND – The VCCS Office of Professional Development and New Horizons Awards Committee are pleased to present the 12 finalists that will compete for the coveted VCCS New Horizons Excellence in Education (EIE) Awards. These finalists were selected from 26 submitted nominees.

 

IMPROVING STUDENT SUCCESS – INSTITUTIONAL

The Advance College Academy: A Comprehensive Dual Enrollment Partnership -  J. Sargeant Reynolds—Henrico

Rethinking SDV 100 - Jump Start to College Success -  Mountain Empire

Innovation Community Exchange (ICE) -  New River

The Great Expectations Student Leadership Program: A Unique Hybrid Learning Experience -  VCCS System Office

INNOVATIVE USE OF TECHNOLOGY – FACE-TO-FACE & ONLINE CLASSROOM

Educating Students to Success though Failure: Lessons from Designing by Iteration -  New River

OTIS (Open Text Initiative System) -  New River

Open Online Homework System for VCCS Chemistry and Biology Courses -  Piedmont Virginia

Improving Student Engagement Through the Use of Chroma Key/Green Screen Technology -  Southside Virginia—Keysville

BEST PRACTICES IN TEACHING FACE-TO-FACE, ONLINE AND STUDENT SUCCESS

Northern Virginia – Extended Learning Institute -  Northern Virginia—Annandale

SCALE (Southern Center for Active Learning Excellence) -  Patrick Henry

Write Here, Write Now: Creating a Culture of Writing at PVCC -  Piedmont Virginia

New Virginians: Engaging with Global/Local Community -  Thomas Nelson—Hampton

 

Finalists will display their projects to the public during opening festivities of the New Horizons annual meeting – the premier teaching and learning conference of Virginia’s Community Colleges – at the Hotel Roanoke on Wednesday, April 1st. Winners will be announced at the New Horizons Awards Banquet on Thursday, April 2nd.

The EIE award acknowledges academic engagement, technology and innovation that enhances student success. “These strategies represent real outside-the-box thinking and the faculties that develop them deserve recognition because they enrich our students’ academic experience in so many different ways and on some many different levels,” said Dr. Abigail Stonerock, director of faculty development.

New Horizons is the single largest gathering of Virginia Community College teachers, researchers, administrators, and professionals. In 2014, New Horizons hosted over 900 attendees including representatives from all VCCS colleges, for over 180 hours of programming, 10 live-streamed sessions, 35+ exhibitors, and honored 12 Excellence in Education Award finalists.

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About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students each year. For more information, please visit http://www.vccs.edu/

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 RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified finalists for the position of president at Northern Virginia Community College, with campuses in Alexandria, Annandale, Loudoun, Manassas, Springfield and Woodbridge. The college is the largest higher education institution in Virginia and the second largest community college in the nation.

The four finalists include Dr. Eugene V. Giovannini, of Gilbert, AZ; Dr. Dawn S. Lindsay, of Annapolis, MD; Dr. Scott Ralls, of Raleigh, NC; and Dr. Walt A. Tobin, of St. Matthews, SC.

Dr. Eugene V. Giovannini is currently president of the Maricopa County Community College District’s Maricopa Corporate College, a 10-college district workforce solutions provider, a position he has held since 2013. Previously he was president of Maricopa’s GateWay Community College in Phoenix from 2002 to 2013 and an adjunct faculty member at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. He has also served as vice president of Burlington County College in Pemberton, NJ and as dean of instructional affairs and interim director of student services at Ivy Tech Community College-Southwest in Evansville, IN. He holds a doctorate in community college education from Virginia Tech and a master’s and bachelor’s degree from Bloomsburg University in Bloomsburg, PA.

Dr. Dawn S. Lindsay is currently president of Anne Arundel Community College in Arnold, MD, a position she has held since 2012. Prior to that she was superintendent and president of Glendale Community College in Glendale, CA from 2009 – 2012, where she also served as executive vice president in 2009 and as vice president for instructional services from 2007-2009. Previously she held administrative leadership positions at Riverside Community College and at Saddleback College, also in California, and was a Youth Services Coordinator in the Howard County Police Department in Endicott, Maryland and addiction treatment program coordinator at Greater Laurel Beltsville Hospital. She holds a doctorate of education from Pepperdine University as well as master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Western Maryland College.

Dr. Scott Ralls is president of the North Carolina Community College System, where he serves as CEO of a system of 58 community colleges, a position he has had since May 2008. Previously he was president of Craven Community College in New Bern and Havelock, NC from 2002-2008, and was vice president for economic and workforce development for the North Carolina Community College System from 1999-2000. He also served in other workforce positions for the North Carolina Community College System, for the North Carolina Chamber of Commerce and for the U.S. Department of Labor. He holds a doctorate and a master’s degree in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of Maryland-College Park and a bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina.

Dr. Walt A. Tobin is currently president and CEO of Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College in Orangeburg, SC, a position he has held since 2011. Previously he was interim president and CEO of Denmark Technical College in Denmark, SC, from 2009-2010, and he was vice president for academic affairs and chief academic officer at Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College from 2002-2011. Prior to joining the South Carolina technical colleges he held several positions in K-12 administration in SC. He holds doctoral degrees in education administration from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor’s degree from Clemson University.

Candidates will attend college interviews at the community college in March; VCCS Chancellor Glenn DuBois hopes to make the appointment in late March. The appointee will replace Dr. Robert G. Templin, who retired this year after more than 12 years with Northern Virginia Community College.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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