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Dixon2RICHMOND - Six new board members will be joining the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education in January.

Dan Dixon, of Arlington, is retired from World Savings Bank as the group senior vice president and director for government relations where he represented the company on public policy issues related to the financial services industry, including consumer protection, housing, federal deposit insurance, bank capital standards and government-sponsored enterprises.

He holds a bachelor’s degree and a master of science in physics from Southern Methodist University, where he also taught physics to undergraduates, and a master of science in management from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. He also taught math to graduate students there. Dixon has been an avid supporter of the Great Expectations program.

 

Dorcas2Dorcas Helfant-Browning, of Virginia Beach, is a managing partner and principal broker with Coldwell Banker Professional Realtors and former chair of the State Board for Community Colleges, as well as former president of .the National Association of Realtors. She has been an active volunteer in her community and was named Hampton Roads Woman of the Year in 1990.

She is a past chair of the Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce and the Virginia Chamber of Commerce. She was also past president of the Virginia Aquarium Foundation; past board member and board chair of Tidewater Community College; and past chair and current board member of Tidewater Community College Real Estate Foundation.

 

Petters3C. Michael Petters, of Newport News, is president and CEO of Huntington Ingalls Industries, and former member of the State Board for Community Colleges. He previously served as president of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding and as president of Northrop Grumman’s Newport News sector. In 2014, Petters was elected to the executive committee of the Aerospace Industries Association.

He serves on the Commonwealth of Virginia's Advisory Council on Revenue Estimates and as chairman of the Virginia Business Council. He also serves on the board of directors for the U.S. Naval Academy Foundation and the National Bureau of Asian Research; on the board of trustees of the Naval Aviation Museum Foundation; on the distinguished advisory board for the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation; and on the advisory council for the Naval Historical Foundation. He holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from the U.S. Naval Academy. He also has an MBA from the College of William and Mary.

 

Roberson3

Stewart Roberson, of Richmond, is chairman, president, and CEO of Moseley Architects. He served as superintendent of schools for Falls Church City Public Schools and Hanover County Public Schools and was a professor at the University of Virginia. Roberson was formerly on the board of trustees for AdvancED, the world’s largest educational accrediting agency, and is the past chair of Bridging Richmond, a collaborative of business leaders, school superintendents, college presidents, and human service providers.

Presently, he is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Virginia Foundation of Independent Colleges and is chair of the Governor’s SOL Innovation Committee. Roberson holds a bachelor’s degree in history, a master’s of education in administration and supervision, and a doctorate in leadership and policy studies, all from the University of Virginia, where he is also a professor of practice. He joined the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Steering Committee in 2015.

 

Wimbush3

F. Blair Wimbush, of Chesapeake, is retired from Norfolk Southern Railway as vice president real estate and chief sustainability officer. He began his railroad career with NS as an attorney and progressed through a number of leadership positions in the NS Law Department, including senior general counsel, before moving into business management. Wimbush has held a number of leadership positions within the legal profession and in the community, including as president or board chairman for the Virginia Commission on Women and Minorities in the Legal Profession, the Virginia Law Foundation, the Roanoke Museum of Fine Arts, and the Virginia Symphony Orchestra.

He chairs the board of the UVA Law School Foundation and is secretary to the board of the Children’s Health System (CHKD). Wimbush holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Rochester and a law degree from the University of Virginia. He also attended the Norfolk Southern Management Development Program at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School.

Wilkerson3

Michael Wilkerson, of Winchester, is manager of the Mid-Atlantic Business Banking Division for Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. for Wells Fargo. He joined Wachovia Bank in 1982 and has held various positions in the retail and business banking areas. He is a graduate of Elon University and the North Carolina School of Banking at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill. He joined the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative Steering Committee in 2015.

Officers of the VFCCE board for 2016 will be: Ronald Holmes, of Fredericksburg, serving as chair; Dorcas Helfant-Browning serving as vice chair; Chandra Lantz of Richmond, secretary; and Gaye Montgomery, of Richmond, treasurer.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education: Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students; helping more Virginia foster youth pursue and complete higher education through its Great Expectations program; and leading a partnership to improve rural Virginia’s education pipeline through the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative. For more information, please visit ww.vccs.edu/giving.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year in both academic and workforce training programs. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND Blue Ridge Community College (BRCC) will soon expand its Commercial Driver’s Licensing (CDL) program to meet the growing demand for truck drivers thanks to an award funded by Valley Proteins, Inc. and administered by the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE).

The BRCC program currently teaches students a variety of challenging maneuvers including parallel parking, off-set parking, and blind side off-set parking. The $10,000 foundation grant will be used to pay for 19 hand-held radios that out-of-the-cab instructors can use to speak directly to students in “real time” while they are behind the wheel. A portion of the grant will also be used to market the CDL program to different populations in the Shenandoah Valley and to host a CDL open house at BRCC next spring. 

[caption id="attachment_21798" align="alignright" width="300"]BRCC check Valley Proteins, Inc. Vice President Michael A. Smith, BRCC President John Downey, and VCCS Chancellor Glenn DuBois[/caption]

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, employment of tractor-trailer truck drivers is expected to grow 11 percent by 2022. In fact, some parts of the country are already experiencing an acute shortage of truck drivers.

"We are so appreciative of this Valley Proteins grant. The goal of our program is to provide the community and industry with the best-trained students possible. This generous grant will provide new training tools and help keep our students focused on that outcome,” observed Jim Butler, BRCC’s CDL program director.  

BRCC employs two full-time instructors and nine adjunct instructors to teach its CDL training program. On average, 100 students per year obtain a CDL-Class A license and another five students obtain a CDL-Class B license. BRCC owns and maintains a fleet of nine tractor trailers.      

The Valley Proteins Endowment Fund is awarded annually to support workforce development programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges in the  areas of environmental science, commercial truck driving, heating and air conditioning, and office technology in regions where the company operates.

"Blue Ridge Community College works hard to position itself as a premier provider of workforce training that produces outstanding employees for in-demand jobs.  This award will support a program that is meeting a critical need for highly qualified drivers with CDL certifications,” said Dr. John Downey, president of Blue Ridge Community College. “We are so grateful to Valley Proteins for their generosity and for their long-standing commitment to Virginia’s Community Colleges.”

Headquartered in Winchester, Valley Proteins, Inc. is committed to supporting the workforce, particularly in the areas in which it has a business presence. The 66-year-old firm operates plants in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. Its processing facilities recycle food waste materials into usable products and bio fuels for feed and industrial applications.

This is the second time Blue Ridge Community College has earned the award. Previous recipients of the annual award include Eastern Shore Community College, John Tyler Community College, Paul D. Camp Community College, and Southside Virginia Community College.

       

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State Board for Community Colleges November 2015 Business Meeting

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges will convene its regular meeting on Thursday, November 19, at 9 a.m. in the offices of the Virginia Community College System at 300 Arboretum Place, Richmond, Virginia, 23236.

State Board Committees will meet on Wednesday, November 18, also at 300 Arboretum Place. The Academic, Student Affairs and Workforce Development Committee and the Budget and Finance Committee meet at 1:30 p.m.; the Facilities Committee and the Personnel Committee meet at 3 p.m.; and the Audit Committee meets at 3:45 p.m. An Executive Committee meeting will take place at the conclusion of all other committee meetings.

Public comment will be received at each regular meeting of the board following the approval of minutes. Persons desiring to comment must notify the Chancellor’s Office in advance as specified by the VCCS Policy Manual.

A complete agenda for the State Board meeting is available at: http://www.boarddocs.com/va/vccs/Board.nsf/Public.

 


About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

 

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RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges will convene its regular meeting on Thursday, September 17, at 9 a.m. in the offices of the Virginia Community College System at 300 Arboretum Place, Richmond, Virginia, 23236.

State Board Committees will meet on Wednesday, Sept. 16, also at 300 Arboretum Place. The Academic, Student Affairs and Workforce Development Committee and the Budget and Finance Committee meet at 1:30 p.m.; the Facilities Committee and the Personnel Committee meet at 3 p.m.; and the Audit Committee meets at 3:30 p.m. 

Public comment will be received at each regular meeting of the board following the approval of minutes. Persons desiring to comment must notify the Chancellor’s Office in advance as specified by the VCCS Policy Manual.

A complete agenda for the State Board meeting is available at: http://www.boarddocs.com/va/vccs/Board.nsf/Public.

 

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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Graciela Billingsley is looking for a lifetime of public service. So it’s only fitting that this high-achieving sophomore at Northern Virginia Community College is the recipient of the Eva Teig Hardy Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship.

Named for the retired Dominion public policy executive who also had an extensive career in state government, the Eva Tieg Hardy Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship is among $350,000 in scholarship funds to be distributed by the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education this year. The funds will benefit more than 65 students from Virginia’s Community Colleges.

Graciela, who took a “service gap” year to serve with the AmeriCorps Civilian Community Corp before attending NOVA, now serves as SGA president at her campus as well as in countless other service club and volunteer roles throughout the community. “Because of my AmeriCorps experience, I want to continue to give back no matter what stage in life I am in. I want to dedicate my life in service to others,” she said in a thank you letter to Ms. Hardy. “Because of this generous scholarship in your honor, I will be able to do just that.” She receives $3,900 to pay for community college tuition and fees for one year.

In addition to named scholarships, the more than 65 recipients this year include nine Valley Proteins Fellows, who will each receive $5,000 in tuition and fees and access to programs to enhance their leadership skills, thanks to support from Valley Proteins, Inc., and at least one Commonwealth Legacy Scholar at each of the 23 community colleges, thanks to support from Wells Fargo.

Valley Proteins Fellows

  • Elaina Schweiker, Eastern Shore Community College
  • Anna Bailey, Germanna Community College
  • Kristin Schaefer, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College
  • Tiffany Riggs, Lord Fairfax Community College
  • Augusto “Gus” Infantas, Northern Virginia Community College
  • Patrick Fritz, Piedmont Virginia Community College
  • Fintan Horan, Piedmont Virginia Community College
  • Joshua Justus, Southwest Virginia Community College
  • Pascal Shukuru, Thomas Nelson Community College

 

Named Scholarships

  • Eva T. Hardy Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: Graciela Billingsley, Northern Virginia; Jameson Cockram, New River; and Sydney Wiles, Germanna
  • ACG Richmond Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: James L. Brent, John Tyler Community College.
  • John Casteen Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: Hunter Newton-Meade, Southwest Virginia; and Laurel Elayne Burdette, Dabney Lancaster and Virginia Western community colleges.
  • Michael A. Smith Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: Aric Porter, Wytheville; Kenley Meredith, Wytheville; and Kennedi Boyd, New River.
  • Kathy Camper Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: Gabriela Jordan Ferrufino, Northern Virginia
  • Central Virginia Chapter of the Institute of Real Estate Management Scholarship: Janice Rinker, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College.
  • Laurens Sartoris Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: Rachel Lyle, Dabney S. Lancaster; and Jennifer McConnell, Northern Virginia.
  • Jonathan Alje Toxopeus Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: Lucia Resendiz Garcia, Lord Fairfax Community College.
  • Gerald L. Baliles Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: Emilee Janney and Jordan Brady, Patrick Henry Community College.
  • The Florence Berman Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: James B. Davis, Rappahannock Community College.
  • The Eleanor Saslaw Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship: Sara K. Gregory, Rappahannock Community College.

A few scholarships have yet to be awarded, including a Potomac Health Fellowship program for students in the Fredericksburg area. Each individual community college will select their own Commonwealth Legacy Scholar for the Wells Fargo program.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education:  Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/giving.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year in both academic and workforce training programs. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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Idalia Fernandez still remembers her first day in a fourth-grade classroom trying to understand the flurry of English around her. Just when she thought she was getting it, everyone suddenly stood up, put their hands on their chests, and began reciting.

“I just moved my lips because I didn’t know the words.” Then and there, the determined youngster made it her mission not only to learn to recite the Pledge of Allegiance, but to understand what every phrase meant.

That kind of dedication to learning and experience as a first generation student has driven Idalia Fernandez for 40 years since her mother made the difficult decision to emigrate from Honduras so that Idalia and her brother would have a chance at a quality education.

Today, she is a director at Community Wealth Partners in Washington, D.C., a consulting firm that works with nonprofits to help them achieve the results they seek from their programs. Previously she was president of the Hispanic College Fund, a nonprofit that prepared Latino high school and college students to succeed in careers in business and STEM.

In July, Fernandez becomes the chair of the State Board for Community Colleges, where she continues to champion 1st generation college students and those from all backgrounds who aspire to realizing their full potential. Her one-year term as chair begins with the State Board meeting on July 15-16, to be held at the Virginia Community College System offices at 300 Arboretum Place in Richmond.

“I feel a moral obligation to provide for others the same opportunities that I received – to help them maximize their ability to be full participants in the workforce and community,” she says. “It’s an exciting time for community colleges,” with the national focus on increasing the percentage of college graduates and a renewed emphasis on completion of industry-recognized credentials, our 23 colleges are positioned to help students succeed in whichever pathway they choose.

“The end game is not the credential, not the degree. The end game is for people to have choices and apply their skills and talent in the workforce.” Fernandez notes. “Completion has to be part of the strategy for people to realize their full potential.”

The ripple effect of the students she has touched through her work and volunteerism is inestimable. Some of them, too, are continuing to give back. She recalls one former student who went on to become a software engineer, and now dedicates time to running robotics camps in his hometown and getting young kids excited about science and technology.

Appointed to the State Board for Community Colleges by former Governor Tim Kaine in 2009, Fernandez – who has a bachelor’s degree in biology from Boston University and an MBA from Averett University – was reappointed to a second four-year term in 2013. She currently resides in Centreville.

Beginning a one-year term as vice chair at the July meeting of the State Board is James Cuthbertson of Glen Allen.

 

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year in both academic and workforce training programs. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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State Board for Community Colleges July 2015 Business Meeting

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges will convene its regular meeting on Thursday, July 16, at 9 a.m. in the offices of the Virginia Community College System at 300 Arboretum Place, Richmond, Virginia, 23236.

State Board Committees will meet on Wednesday, July 15, also at 300 Arboretum Place. The Academic, Student Affairs and Workforce Development Committee and the Budget and Finance Committee meet at 1:30 p.m.; the Facilities Committee and the Personnel Committee meet at 3 p.m.; and the Audit Committee meets at 3:30 p.m. An Executive Committee meeting will take place at the conclusion of all other committee meetings.

Public comment will be received at each regular meeting of the board following the approval of minutes. Persons desiring to comment must notify the Chancellor’s Office in advance as specified by the VCCS Policy Manual.

A complete agenda for the State Board meeting is available at: http://www.boarddocs.com/va/vccs/Board.nsf/Public.

 

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About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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State Board Sets Tuition for 2015-2016 Academic Year
~ Approves Pilot Programs to Reduce Tuition and Textbook Costs for Select Programs~

RICHMOND —  The State Board for Community Colleges established the 2015-2016 academic year in-state tuition and mandatory fees rate at $142.50 per credit hour at its regular May meeting. Beginning this fall, in-state students will pay an additional $6.50 per credit hour, which means the cost of a typical three-hour class will increase by $19.50 and the cost of a full-time load of classes for the year will increase by $195.

The board also approved several programs designed to reduce students’ costs, including two pilot programs. The first pilot discounts tuition, as much as 25 percent, for some students at Danville Community College. The program aims to attract first generation students who live near the college into some of the most highly demanded programs through weekend and evening classes.

The second pilot authorizes five community colleges: Blue Ridge in Weyers Cave; Dabney Lancaster in Clifton Forge, Germanna in Fredericksburg; Patrick Henry in Martinsville; and Virginia Western in Roanoke to reduce textbook costs in select programs.

The third program will further reduce student textbook costs by expanding the usage of Open Educational Resources (OER) at more than half of Virginia’s Community Colleges. OER provides web-based cost-free textbooks. Students can save as much as $300 per course for which OER materials are fully available. A full-time student could save as much as $1,500 per semester.

Virginia’s Community Colleges will use the tuition increase to pay their share of employee pay raises and rising retirement and benefit costs. It will also pay for a new 24-hour student financial aid help desk, and the operating costs for new buildings across the state.

“Virginia’s Community Colleges are lean operations, equally concerned with affordable student access and providing a high-quality educational experience. Today’s tuition decision by the board strikes an important balance in that regard,” said Dorcas Helfant-Browning, chair of the State Board for Community Colleges.

KEEPING A PUBLIC PROMISE

The board’s tuition decision is in accord with Achieve 2015, the VCCS six-year strategic plan that calls for keeping community college tuition and fee rates at one-half or less than that of the comparable rates at Virginia’s four-year universities.

Currently, tuition and mandatory fees at Virginia’s Community Colleges are approximately one-third of the average of comparable tuition and fees charged by Virginia’s public four-year institutions.

DANVILLE PILOT PROGRAM

The Danville Community College pilot program aims to educate more welders, industrial maintenance technicians and information technology workers by making it easier for first generation students to afford and navigate the college’s programs. The pilot program seeks to enroll select students on a fulltime basis with a class schedule that emphasizes evenings and weekends and focused academic and support services.

TEXTBOOK COSTS REDUCTION PILOT

The effort approved by the Board to reduce textbook costs for select programs at five community colleges is a part of the VCCS partnership with Follett’s includED program, which uses technology and volume purchasing to replace the costs of textbooks with a lower materials fee students pay per course. The Board’s decision is a green light for the colleges to continue their work of designating which programs are subject to the pilot for the coming fall semester.

“We’re excited to see where the results of these one-year pilot programs take us,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “I applaud the college’s leaders for taking a fresh approach to align the needs of people and employers throughout their region, and to confront the costs of textbooks and materials which can be a deterrent to students and their families.”

TUITION DIFFERENTIALS

The State Board also agreed to approve for several colleges increases in the tuition differential rates that are in addition to the base tuition. The board approved increasing the differential for Northern Virginia Community College by $2.00 per credit hour. Even with the differential, NVCC’s tuition remains the lowest among comparable colleges in the Washington, D.C. metro area.

Further, the board approved an increase of $1.00 per credit hour to the tuition differential rate for J. Sargeant Reynolds in Richmond; Germanna; Lord Fairfax in Winchester; Tidewater; Thomas Nelson in Hampton and Williamsburg; and Virginia Western community colleges.

The tuition differential rate for Piedmont Virginia Community College, in Charlottesville, remains unchanged from last year.

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION

The State Board increased the tuition rate for out-of-state students by $6.50 per credit hour to a total of $337.10 per credit hour. Out-of-state students make up approximately 5-percent of the total enrollment of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created nearly 50 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve an estimated 400,000 students a year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

 

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RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges will convene its regular meeting on Thursday, May 21, at 9 a.m. in the offices of the Virginia Community College System at 300 Arboretum Place, Richmond, Virginia, 23236.

State Board Committees will meet on Wednesday, May 20, also at 300 Arboretum Place. The Academic, Student Affairs and Workforce Development Committee and the Budget and Finance Committee meet at 1:30 p.m.; the Facilities Committee and the Personnel Committee meet at 3 p.m.; and the Audit Committee meets at 3:30 p.m. An Executive Committee meeting will take place at the conclusion of all other committee meetings. The Nominating Committee of the State Board will meet at 10 a.m.

Public comment will be received at each regular meeting of the board following the approval of minutes. Persons desiring to comment must notify the Chancellor’s Office in advance as specified by the VCCS Policy Manual.

A complete agenda for the State Board meeting is available at: http://www.boarddocs.com/va/vccs/Board.nsf/Public.

 

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About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

[post_title] => State Board Holds May Business Meeting [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-holds-may-business-meeting [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-18 11:08:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-18 15:08:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=18751 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 18702 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2015-05-11 11:03:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-11 15:03:41 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – More community college students in Virginia soon may be able to earn a degree with little to no textbook costs, thanks to a grant to Virginia’s Community Colleges from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The $200,000 grant will be used to fund a pilot program at 15 of Virginia’s Community Colleges. The project would offer textbook-free credentials to students enrolled in designated programs. 

Based in part on Tidewater Community College’s immensely successful all-Open Educational Resources (OER) initiative, or “Z-Degree” program, the grant-funded pilot is expected to save some 50,000 students over $5 million in its first year by using high-quality open textbooks and other OER materials, which are freely accessible and openly-licensed. 

“Textbook costs have been a barrier since before I was a community college student,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “Technology is changing the way we access information, making it faster and less expensive without compromising quality. We may never be able to bring that to every course of study. We owe it to our students, however, to bring that flexibility to every course that we can.”

Virginia’s Community Colleges are a national leader in developing OER materials and courses. Their investment, over the last three years, have engaged more than 100 faculty members at 16 colleges to create more than 70 open courses.

“We are proud to support Virginia’s Community Colleges in this effort to make education more accessible by providing students with the course materials they need, when they need them, using open educational resources,” said Hewlett Foundation Program Officer TJ Bliss. “This project will not only make education more affordable to students of Virginia’s Community Colleges, it will also increase their faculty’s freedom and flexibility to open up the classroom with a wide range of adaptable course materials.”

(photo courtesy of Lumen Learning) 

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students each year. For more information, please visit http://www.vccs.edu/

About The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation: The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation helps people build measurably better lives, concentrating its resources on activities in education, the environment, global development and population, performing arts, and philanthropy, as well as grants to support disadvantaged communities in the San Francisco Bay Area. On the web: www.hewlett.org.

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[post_title] => Virginia’s Community Colleges Receive Grant to Cut Textbook Costs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virginias-community-colleges-receive-grant-to-cut-textbook-costs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-12 14:36:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-12 18:36:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=18702 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
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