College Locator
If you are in Virginia, you are just 30 miles from a community college.
Here are the community colleges closest to
Home > News Archive

News Archive

Home > News Archive

  
	  
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 26746
            [post_author] => 3
            [post_date] => 2017-03-27 14:19:22
            [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-27 18:19:22
            [post_content] => 

RICHMOND – A committee of the State Board for Community Colleges will meet on Friday, March 31, 2017, at 12:15 p.m. at the VCCS System Office at 300 Arboretum Place, Suite 200, Richmond, VA to certify a panel of finalists under consideration to become the next President of New River Community College (NRCC).

Dr. Charlie White is serving as the college’s interim president. Dr. Jack Lewis, the college’s fifth president, retired in December after serving the college for more than 42 years, including 17 as president.

The national search to find New River’s next permanent president has attracted more than 90 applicants. The finalists certified by the Board will each spend a day on campus in April to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

New River Community College, which opened in 1969, is a comprehensive community college located in the New River Valley of Virginia, serving an estimated 4,500 students in the counties of Montgomery, Floyd, Pulaski and Giles, and the city of Radford.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee to Certify Finalists for New River Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-to-certify-finalists-for-new-river-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-27 14:19:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-27 18:19:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26746 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26696 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-03-09 15:13:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-09 20:13:50 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges will convene its regular meeting on Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. in the Conference Center Gallery on the campus of J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College at 1651 E. Parham Rd., Richmond, VA 23228.

State Board Committees will meet on Wednesday, March 15, also in the Conference Center Gallery. The Academic, Student Affairs and Workforce Development Committee and the Budget and Finance Committee meet at 1:30 p.m. (Salons 3 and 2 respectively); the Facilities Committee and the Personnel Committee meet at 3 p.m. (Salon 2 and the Executive Board Room respectively); and the Audit Committee meets at 3:45 p.m. in Salon 3. An Executive Committee meeting will take place at the conclusion of all other committee meetings in the Executive Board Room.

Public comment will be received at each regular meeting of the board following the approval of minutes. Persons desiring to comment must notify the Chancellor’s Office in advance as specified by the VCCS Policy Manual.

A complete agenda for the State Board meeting is available at:  http://www.boarddocs.com/va/vccs/Board.nsf/Public.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Virginia State Board for Community Colleges March 2017 Business Meeting to be Held at Reynolds Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virginia-state-board-for-community-colleges-march-2017-business-meeting-to-be-held-at-reynolds-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-09 15:14:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-09 20:14:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26696 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26823 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-03-01 14:24:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-01 19:24:11 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE) has partnered with one of the nation’s largest retailers to respond to a growing need in the local labor market.

Thanks to a generous $80,000 grant from Walmart, the VFCCE is pledging to help hundreds of Richmond-area community college students pay for their certification exams.

The students targeted for assistance through the Workforce Credential Award initiative have completed their studies in a high-demand field like manufacturing, IT, or healthcare but may not be able to afford the cost of the certification exam (average cost of $200). The lack of certification delays their entry into the workforce.

The target population for the initiative are students at J. Sargeant Reynolds and John Tyler Community Colleges who have completed an industry-recognized and approved credit workforce training program but lack the financial resources to pay for the required certification exam.

Awards will be made on a first-come, first-served basis. The grant is expected to fund certification exams for an estimated 360 students. It is projected that 90% of the students who participate in the program will pass the exam and immediately enter the workforce in the Greater Richmond area.

Featured image (l to r): Dr. Sharon Morrissey, vice chancellor for academic services & research, Dr. Gary Rhodes, president, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, Glenn DuBois, chancellor, Peter Johnson, Walmart market manager (north Richmond), Dennis Dickson, Walmart market manager (south Richmond), Robert Davis, Walmart regional general manager, Dr. Ted Raspiller, president, John Tyler Community College

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education: Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students; helping more Virginia foster youth pursue and complete higher education through its Great Expectations program; and leading a partnership to improve rural Virginia’s education pipeline through the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/Foundation.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 300,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

 

###

[post_title] => Walmart Partners with Local Community Colleges on Workforce Credentials [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => walmart-partners-with-local-community-colleges-on-workforce-credentials [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-08 15:07:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-08 19:07:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26823 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26643 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-03-01 12:03:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-01 17:03:05 [post_content] =>

~Funds support solar/renewable workforce development at seven community colleges~

Richmond, Va. – Virginia’s Community Colleges are creating and expanding training programs for those seeking careers in renewable energy, thanks in part to a grant of $150,000 from the Dominion Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Dominion Virginia Power.

The grant to the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, or VFCCE, is helping seven community colleges fund new energy labs and equipment, allowing them to offer solar panel technician training and other renewable energy courses. The community colleges benefitting from the initiative are John Tyler, Northern Virginia, Tidewater, Virginia Highlands, Mountain Empire, Southside Virginia and Central Virginia.

Virginia aspires to be a leader in solar produced power, but needs to bolster its solar workforce to leverage significant investments being made in the sector. Installing and maintaining solar panels for solar farms, residential communities, commercial developments and other structures will require more skilled workers.

“Virginia can’t afford to miss out on a growing industry like solar energy because our workforce lacks the training and skills to seize the opportunity,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “We are delighted to work with Dominion to prepare the next generation of solar workers – another big example of our efforts to meet the needs of Virginia’s business community to help grow the Commonwealth’s economy.”

Virginia currently ranks 30th in the nation for solar energy production, but many companies, including Dominion Virginia Power, are forging ahead to add solar energy to the grid. Dominion is committed to developing 400 megawatts of renewable energy by 2020. It currently has 398 megawatts of large-scale solar facilities (enough to power 95,000 homes) under development or in operation in 12 Virginia localities. In January, the company completed three large-scale solar farms that employed 550 workers during construction.

“Virginia’s community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide the training for skilled workers in renewable energy fields,” said Hunter A. Applewhite, president of the Dominion Foundation. “We are excited to support these initiatives that will help boost job growth in Virginia.”

This workforce development project started in 2016. It will grow in 2017 to expand the curriculum to all community colleges that offer energy programs. The curriculum will also support expansion of energy programs at high schools through dual enrollment and usage of mobile solar labs.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE)
Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students; helping more Virginia foster youth pursue and complete higher education through its Great Expectations program; and leading a partnership to improve rural Virginia’s education pipeline through the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/giving.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges
Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 300,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

About Dominion
Dominion (NYSE: D), is one of the nation’s largest producers and transporters of energy. The Dominion Foundation is dedicated to improving the physical, social and economic well-being of the communities served by Dominion companies, including Dominion Virginia Power. The Foundation supports nonprofit causes that meet basic human needs, protect the environment, support education and promote community vitality. For more information, visit www.dom.com.

# # #

[post_title] => Dominion Invests in Virginia’s Community Colleges to Train Workers for Emerging Solar/Renewables Industries [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dominion-invests-in-virginias-community-colleges-to-train-workers-for-emerging-solarrenewables-industries [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-01 12:03:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-01 17:03:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26643 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26637 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-02-28 10:43:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-28 15:43:19 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Germanna Community College. The finalists were among more than 100 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists include Dr. John R. Donnelly of Charlottesville, VA; Dr. Janet Gullickson, of Spokane, WA; and Dr. Linda Thomas-Glover, of Onley, VA.

“This opportunity at Germanna is attracting an impressive breadth and depth of talent,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “We take that as a vote of confidence in the college, as well as the entire Virginia Community College System. Our focus on student success, our innovative approaches to providing short-term workforce training and our stability make us attractive to community college leaders who yearn to make a difference.”

Dr. John R. Donnelly is currently vice president for instruction and student services at Piedmont Virginia Community College, a position he has held since 2010. Prior to that, he served for two years as vice president of academic and student affairs/provost for Massachusetts Bay Community College in Wellesley Hills, MA. Donnelly began his community college career as an adjunct instructor of history at Germanna Community College in 1999 and rose through the ranks serving as a full-time faculty member and eventually an assistant dean and dean at the college. He holds a doctorate in higher education from the University of Virginia, master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Virginia Commonwealth University, and a bachelor’s degree from James Madison University.

Dr. Janet Gullickson has presided over two community colleges, including her current position as president of Spokane Falls Community College, a position she has held since 2012. Prior to that, she served two years as chief academic officer for the second largest district of the Community Colleges of Spokane. Gullickson served as president of Front Range Community College in Westminster, CO, between 2004 and 2005. She was also interim president and provost of what is now known as Minnesota’s Northeast Higher Education District. Gullickson holds a doctorate in education from the University of Minnesota, a master’s degree from South Dakota State University, and a bachelor’s degree from the University of South Dakota.

Dr. Linda Thomas-Glover is the current president of Eastern Shore Community College, a position she has held since 2009. Prior to that, she served as provost/chief academic officer of Elizabethtown Community and Technical College in Kentucky beginning in 2004. Thomas-Glover also worked for more than a decade at Guilford Technical Community College in Jamestown, NC, rising through several positions, ultimately serving a nine-month term as the college’s interim vice president of instruction. She holds a doctorate in chemistry from Temple University, a master’s degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and a bachelor’s degree from South Carolina State College.

The three finalists are vying to succeed Dr. David Sam, who has served as Germanna’s president for nearly a decade. Sam announced last summer that he would retire at the end of the current academic year.

The finalists will each spend a day or more on the campuses of Germanna between Monday, March 20 and Thursday, March 30, 2017, to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Germanna Community College, which opened in 1970, is a two-year, public institution of higher education, serving a total headcount of about 13,000, including both students in academic courses and workforce development training, in the counties of Caroline, Culpeper, King George, Madison, Orange, Spotsylvania, Stafford and the city of Fredericksburg.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Three Finalists for Germanna Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-three-finalists-for-germanna-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-28 10:43:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-28 15:43:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26637 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26618 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-02-21 16:00:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-21 21:00:39 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – A committee of the State Board for Community Colleges will meet on Tuesday, February 28, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. in the Board Room of the System Office at 300 Arboretum Place, Suite 200, Richmond, VA, to certify a panel of finalists under consideration to become the next President of Germanna Community College.               

Dr. David Sam, who has served as Germanna’s president for nearly a decade, announced last summer that he would retire at the end of the current academic year.               

The process to replace Sam has attracted more than 100 applicants. Each of the finalists certified by the Board will spend a day on campus between Monday, March 20 and Thursday, March 30, 2017, to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.               

Germanna Community College, which opened in 1970, is a two-year, public institution of higher education, serving a total headcount of about 13,000, including students in academic courses and workforce development training, in the counties of Caroline, Culpeper, King George, Madison, Orange, Spotsylvania, Stafford and the city of Fredericksburg.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 300,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee to Certify Finalists for Germanna Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-to-certify-finalists-for-germanna-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-21 16:00:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-21 21:00:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26618 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26524 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-02-01 15:31:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-01 20:31:26 [post_content] =>

~ Affordable pricing, job prospects in high-demand careers attract students across every region of Virginia. ~

RICHMOND — Virginia’s unique pay-for-performance program to help more individuals earn the workforce credentials necessary for jobs in high-demand careers is, itself, generating high demand.

In just its first seven months, Virginia’s New Economy Workforce Industry Credential Grants program has enrolled 3,309 people, of which more than half have already completed training, and 824 have earned an industry-recognized credential in a high-demand field.

The credentials at the heart of this program are postsecondary, industry-recognized certifications and licensures that people achieve through short-term community college training programs in fields ranging from healthcare and information technology to manufacturing, skilled trades and logistics. The grants program focuses on specific skills that Virginia businesses say are in high demand and can lead to good jobs in growing career fields.

“These credential grants represent the most important change in the way the state prepares workers for jobs of the future. Businesses across the state told us to focus less on degrees and more on skills, and that is what this program does. We’re off to a good start,” said Del. Kathy Byron (R-Bedford County), who sponsored the legislation creating the grants program last year, along with state Sen. Frank Ruff (R-Clarksville).

The grants program, which relies on businesses to determine what credentials are in high demand within their region, is facilitated through the Virginia Board for Workforce Development. Community colleges respond to that need by creating or expanding short-term training programs. More than 130 specific training programs have been deemed eligible through that process.

“For years the business community has been concerned about the ability to find potential employees with the skills needed in today's economy. This program has given businesses hope that they are being heard, and that we are responding. I look forward to expanding this effort,” said Sen. Ruff.

Students who pursue these training programs are eligible for the grants on a first-come, first-served basis. The grants cover two-thirds of the training program costs, leaving students to pay for the remaining third, typically a price ranging between $100 and $1,100.

Nearly a third of the students who enroll in the program (28%) are pursing credentials in the healthcare field. A similar percentage (30%) are working toward logistics-related credentials. A quarter of the students are enrolled in manufacturing and welding (15%) and other skilled trades (9%). Information technology credentials, including cybersecurity, attracted 11% of grant students, and the remaining 8% are pursuing credentials in business and education.

“This is a good news story for both individuals and the employers who seek to hire them,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “These grants have accelerated the work of our colleges to deliver the trained and skilled workforce that everyone agrees is critical to Virginia’s economic future.”

The success of this program can be found in every region of Virginia, with colleges serving urban, suburban and rural communities all experiencing enrollment increases.

“This grant program is the most important economic development legislation that the General Assembly has passed in a decade,” said Brett Vassey, president and CEO of the Virginia Manufacturers Association. “Our members tell us that these industry-recognized credentials meet more than 60 percent of their workplace needs. This program is taking Virginia in the right direction.”

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 300,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Heavy Demand, Early Success Highlights First Seven Months of Virginia’s New Economy Workforce Industry Credential Grants [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => heavy-demand-early-success-highlights-first-seven-months-of-virginias-new-economy-workforce-industry-credential-grants [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-05 00:23:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-05 05:23:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26524 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26297 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2016-12-09 10:00:22 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-09 15:00:22 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND — The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education is presenting Paul D. Camp Community College with the 8th Annual Valley Proteins Award for Workforce Development. The $10,000 grant is funded by Valley Proteins, and it will help the college create a Career Studies Certificate (CSC) program in energy technology with a focus on solar energy.

With four large solar farms in various stages of review, approval, and construction within the PDCCC service region, college officials were eager to get the program up and running to accommodate the nearly 500 specially-trained jobs the facilities will require. Paul D. Camp has campuses in both Franklin and Suffolk.

“This CSC in energy technology will provide both the entry-level and mid-level solar energy training to support the construction, operation, and maintenance of the burgeoning solar industry currently underway in the rural Hampton Roads area,” said VCCS Chancellor Glenn DuBois.

The Valley Proteins Endowment Fund is awarded annually to support workforce development programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges in the areas of environmental science, commercial truck driving, heating and air conditioning, and office technology.

"We are very grateful to have received this Valley Proteins grant. The goal of our program is to provide the community and industry with the best-trained students possible. This generous grant will provide our students job opportunities in the growing field of solar energy in PDCCC’s service region,” observed PDCCC President Dan Lufkin.

The process of earning a certificate in energy technology can be completed in one academic year. PDCCC expects to begin offering the Energy Technology Career Studies Certificate program in the fall of 2017. It is anticipated that the success of the first class of graduates will attract even more students to the program.

This is the second time Paul D. Camp Community College has earned the award. Previous recipients of the annual award include Blue Ridge Community College, Eastern Shore Community College, John Tyler Community College, and Southside Virginia Community College.

Headquartered in Winchester, Valley Proteins, Inc. is committed to supporting the workforce, particularly in the areas in which it has a business presence. The 66-year-old firm operates plants in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. Its processing facilities recycle food waste materials into usable products and bio fuels for feed and industrial applications.

*Featured image: PDCCC President Dan Lufkin (l) is presented a check by Valley Proteins President J.J. Smith during this year's Hire Ed Conference at the Homestead.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education: Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students; helping more Virginia foster youth pursue and complete higher education through its Great Expectations program; and leading a partnership to improve rural Virginia’s education pipeline through the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/giving.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu. To share a story about how community colleges change lives, visit 50.vccs.edu. ###

[post_title] => Foundation Grant Will Enable Paul D. Camp Community College to Respond to Growing Demand for Solar Jobs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => foundation-grant-will-enable-paul-d-camp-community-college-to-respond-to-growing-demand-for-solar-jobs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-09 15:35:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-09 20:35:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26297 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26193 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2016-11-21 13:42:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-11-21 18:42:41 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND — The inaugural George B. Vaughan Leadership Award for Outstanding Adjunct Faculty has been awarded to an impressive group of community college professors. The five award recipients were chosen from among the approximately 9,000 adjunct faculty members throughout Virginia’s 23 community colleges and announced during a dinner reception held in conjunction with the 2016 VCCS First Year and Adjunct Faculty Institute in Glen Allen, VA on Nov. 17.

The award, named in honor of Vaughan’s distinguished career in higher education was created by the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education to highlight the achievements of part-time faculty members. Vaughan was the founding president of Mountain Empire Community College who would go on later to take the helm at Piedmont Virginia Community College. Vaughan has written more than 100 books and been named one of America’s 50 most effective community college presidents.

The Vaughan Award recognizes one outstanding adjunct faculty member from each of the Virginia Community College’s five regions served by a Regional Center for Teaching Excellence. Each award also includes a check for $1,000.

“The instructors we honor with the Vaughan Award are among our very best,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “These part-time instructors make a big-time impact on the students they serve, as well the success of those students. And we are honored to have George Vaughan joining us as these inaugural awards are announced.”

The honorees include:

Dr. Trina Campbell
Adjunct Instructor for Math, Germanna Community College, Northern Virginia Region
Mrs. Toby Cook
Adjunct Instructor for Health Care Technician I & II (Nurse Aide), Virginia Highlands Community College, Southwest Region
Ms. Marcie Gale
Adjunct Instructor for Electronics, Engineering, Math, and STEM Academy, Central Virginia Community College, Central Virginia Region
Dr. Joyce Hurt
Adjunct Instructor for English, Southside Virginia Community College, Mid-Central Region
Mr. David Warren
Adjunct Instructor of Music, Tidewater Community College, Tidewater Region

*Feature image (L to R): Toby Cook (VHCC), VHCC President Gene Couch, Marcie Gale (CVCC), CVCC President John Capps, David Warren (TCC), Dr. Kerry Ragno (TCC), Chancellor Glenn DuBois, Peggy Vaughan, Dr. George Vaughan, Trina Campbell (GCC), Dr. Jeanne Wesley (GCC), Dr. Joyce Hurt (SVCC), and SVCC President Al Roberts.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 300,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu. To share a story about how community colleges change lives, visit 50.vccs.edu.

[post_title] => Inaugural Leadership Award Recognizes Outstanding Adjunct Professors [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => inaugural-leadership-award-recognizes-outstanding-adjunct-professors [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-11-21 13:42:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-11-21 18:42:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26193 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26044 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2016-10-24 12:16:19 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-10-24 16:16:19 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – Dr. Glenn Dubois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today the appointment of Dr. Charlie White as interim president of New River Community College (NRCC) effective January 2017. White’s appointment as the college’s interim president will continue until a statewide committee selects the next permanent president of the college, which serves Virginia’s New River Valley communities.

[caption id="attachment_26045" align="alignright" width="125"]charlie-white_2 Dr. Charlie White[/caption]

Dr. White was employed in various positions within Virginia’s Community College (VCCS) since 1971 when he joined the NRCC faculty. He chaired the Division of Arts and Sciences at NRCC from 1983-1998, and was a professor of Biology and chair of the Math and Science Division prior to that. White was also NRCC’s vice president for instruction and student services, as well as interim vice chancellor for academic services and research in the VCCS office during 2005 before serving as president of Wytheville Community College from 2006-2015.

White holds a doctorate from the University of Tennessee and bachelor’s and master’s degrees from East Tennessee State University. He also holds an associate degree from Hiwassee College in Tennessee.

“Charlie is legendary within the VCCS,” said Glenn DuBois, Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “He did a tremendous job as president of Wytheville Community College for nine years. But he also has a pedigree with New River Community College as a faculty member and chief academic officer. We are delighted he has agreed to come out of retirement to serve as interim president of New River.”

“I couldn’t be happier to return to my old stomping grounds,” said White. “It’s like coming home. I look forward to reconnecting with the college, faculty and students, and to the challenges and opportunities the position brings.”

White will succeed Dr. Jack M. Lewis, who will retire in December 2016 and served NRCC in various capacities for nearly 42 years before becoming president in 2000.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu. To share a story about how community colleges change lives, visit 50.vccs.edu.

# # #

[post_title] => Virginia’s Community Colleges Hire Dr. Charlie White to Serve as Interim President of New River Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virginias-community-colleges-hire-dr-charlie-white-to-serve-as-interim-president-of-new-river-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-10-24 12:16:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-10-24 16:16:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=26044 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
Page 4 of 16« First...23456...10...Last »