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RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified four finalists for the position of president at Mountain Empire Community College. The finalists were among more than 80 applicants from across the nation.

The four finalists are Dr. David L. Brand of Fayetteville, NC; Dr. Brian W. Van Horn of Murray, KY; Dr. Kristen A. Westover of Martinsville, VA; and Dr. Steven K. Yoho of Roswell, GA.

“The Mountain Empire Community College presidency is appealing to an impressive collection of community college leaders from around the country,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “The focus our colleges place on student success, our innovative approaches to providing short-term workforce training, and our stability make us attractive to high-performing education leaders seeking their next career step.”

Dr. David L. Brand has worked in higher education for the last 18 years, following a 23-year career in the United States Army from which he retired at the rank of Major. Brand currently serves as the senior vice president and chief academic officer of Fayetteville Technical Community College in North Carolina, a role he has held since 2012. Prior to that, he worked as the director of the Department of Education, a senior civilian role at the U.S. Army Special Operations Command at Fort Bragg, NC. He also worked as the senior military training and education analyst at the Center for Army Lessons Learned, based at Fort Leavenworth, KS. Brand previously served as the chief academic officer and dean of the college at Bauder College in Atlanta. For six years, he worked at DeVry University and the Keller Graduate School of Management in Atlanta, where he began as a director of academic operations, rose to become dean of the education center and then the regional director of operations. Brand earned a doctorate from the University of South Carolina; a master’s degree from the University of Houston, and a bachelor’s degree from Troy State University.

Dr. Brian W. Van Horn has nearly 20 years of experience in higher education. He currently serves as the associate provost and dean of regional academic outreach at Murray State University, in Murray, KY, a position he has held since 2008. His MSU career began in 1998 when he served as an assistant professor and director of the MSU Paducah Regional Campus, and then as the university’s assistant dean of regional academic outreach in 2001. Van Horn has served as both vice president, in 2013, and president, in 2014, of the Association for Continuing Higher Education. He holds a doctorate from the University of Memphis, and both a master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Murray State University.

Dr. Kristen A. Westover has more than 25 years of experience in higher education. She currently serves as the vice president for academic and student services at Patrick Henry Community College in Martinsville, a position she has held since 2011. Previously, she served as higher education program coordinator at the University of Texas in Austin, from 2009-2011. From 2008-2009, she served as director of technical programs for the Kansas Board of Regents. In 2016, the Aspen Institute selected Westover for inclusion in the inaugural class of its national Aspen Presidential Fellows program. She holds a doctorate from Nova Southeastern University in Florida, and both a master’s degree in instructional technology and a bachelor’s degree from Fort Hays State University in Kansas.

Dr. Steven K. Yoho has more than 20 years of experience in higher education, intermixed with positions he has held in other industries. He currently serves as president of both the Atlanta campus and Northern Virginia campus of Argosy University, a position he has held since 2013. Yoho began his academic career in 1992 as an adjunct professor at Marietta College and Washington State Community College. He became the business chair and athletic director of Ohio Valley University in Vienna, WV in 1994. Yoho went on to become associate dean of the Lipscomb University College of Business in 1999, and later worked in the University System office of South University in Savannah, GA, for seven years as dean of the College of Business in 2007, and later as vice chancellor for academic affairs in 2008. He holds a doctorate from Ohio University; a master’s degree from West Virginia University; a bachelor’s degree from Oklahoma Christian University; and an associate degree from Ohio Valley College.

The four finalists seek to succeed Dr. Scott Hamilton, the college’s sixth president, who is retiring at the end of June after serving in that role since 2010.

The finalists will each visit the campus of MECC in May, to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Mountain Empire Community College, founded in 1972 and located in Big Stone Gap, VA, is a comprehensive two-year college serving approximately 3,800 credit students and more than 1,000 noncredit students annually from the counties of Lee, Scott, Wise, and Dickenson, and the city of Norton.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – Dr. Pat Huber will become the next president of New River Community College, effective on or before July 1, 2017. That announcement was made today by Dr. Glenn DuBois, the chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. Huber becomes the sixth person, and first woman, to serve as the college’s permanent president. Her hiring ends a process that began with a national search, which attracted more than 90 candidates, and finished earlier this month with open-to-the-community visits of four finalists to the college.

[caption id="attachment_26893" align="alignright" width="214"] Huber[/caption]

“I’ve known Pat for a long time and have always been impressed with her remarkable passion and dedication for the people community colleges serve,” said DuBois. “Pat has dedicated her entire career to community college education, and I know that she is going to do a terrific job as New River’s president.”

Huber has worked in education for 41 years, and has worked at New River Community College since 1988 where she began as an adjunct English instructor. She began working at NRCC full time in 1992 as an assistant professor. From there, she rose through the ranks becoming an assistant division chair in 1999, a dean in 2005, and vice president for instruction and student services in 2007 – the position she holds today. Huber also served as interim vice president for academic and student services at Wytheville Community College during the spring and summer of 2003.

Huber earned a doctorate in community college leadership from Old Dominion University; a master’s degree from West Virginia University in Morgantown; a bachelor’s degree from Emory & Henry College in Emory, VA; and an associate degree from Wytheville Community College.

“The quality of the candidates this process produced made this decision a tough one,” said Steve Harvey, chair of the New River Community College local board. “That said, Dr. Huber has demonstrated outstanding leadership at NRCC in the past. She is focused on curriculum, certifications and credentialing, student success, and intentional engagement in the education of students. She is committed to outreach to local businesses, school systems, and higher education facilities within the five localities serviced by NRCC. Under Dr. Huber’s guidance, NRCC will continue to be an affordable educational option to help provide the local economy an educated workforce. The board will work closely with her during her transition, and I encourage the local stakeholders to be engaged in the process.”

Huber will succeed Dr. Jack Lewis, who retired last year after serving NRCC for 42 years, including 17 as college president. Longtime Virginia community college leader, Dr. Charlie White, is currently serving at the college’s interim president.

New River Community College, which opened in 1969, is a comprehensive community college located in Virginia’s New River Valley, serving an estimated 4,500 students in the counties of Montgomery, Floyd, Pulaski and Giles and the city of Radford.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – A committee of the State Board for Community Colleges will meet on Thursday, April 27, 2017, at 4:00 p.m. at Community Wealth Ventures Inc., 1825 K. Street, N.W., Washington, D.C., 20006 to certify a panel of finalists under consideration to become the next President of Mountain Empire Community College (MECC).

Dr. Scott Hamilton, the college’s sixth president, is retiring at the end of June after serving as MECC’s president since 2010.

The national search to find MECC’s next permanent president attracted more than 80 applicants. The finalists certified by the Board will each spend a day on campus in May to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Founded in 1972 and located in Big Stone Gap, VA, Mountain Empire Community College is a comprehensive two-year college serving approximately 3,800 credit students and more than 1,000 noncredit students annually from the counties of Lee, Scott, Wise, and Dickenson counties, and the city of Norton.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – Dr. Janet Gullickson will become the sixth president of Germanna Community College. That announcement was made today by Dr. Glenn DuBois, the chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. Gullickson’s hiring caps off a process that began with a national search, which attracted more than 100 candidates, and finished last month with open-to-the-community visits of three finalists to the college.

“Janet brings outstanding qualifications to this presidency,” said DuBois. “She’s a dynamic community college educator with an impressive resume of significant leadership positions. I’m excited to bring her aboard and confident she’ll do a great job at Germanna.”

Gullickson has presided over two community colleges, including her current position as the president of Spokane Falls Community College, a position she has held since 2012. Prior to that, she served two years as the chief academic officer for the second largest district of the Community Colleges of Spokane. Gullickson served as the president of Front Range Community College in Westminster, CO between 2004 and 2005. She was also the interim president and provost in Minnesota of what is now called the Northeast Higher Education District, which includes Ely, Eveleth and Virginia.

She holds a doctorate in education from the University of Minnesota, a master’s degree from South Dakota State University and a bachelor’s degree from the University of South Dakota.

“This wasn’t an easy choice and that’s a compliment to the process and the finalists it produced,” said William E. Thomas, of Culpeper, the chair of the Germanna Community College local board. “The community really engaged with this process and they felt a strong connection to Dr. Gullickson. She really shares their priorities, and seems to understand the challenges we face in a fast-growing region. During our interview Janet indicated that she very much wanted to be the next president of Germanna, but only if she was a good fit. The responses from college employees, as well as many stakeholders was that they saw her as a great fit. We look forward to working with her when she arrives this summer.”

Gullickson will succeed Dr. David Sam, who has served as Germanna’s president for nearly a decade. Sam announced last summer that he would retire at the end of the current academic year.

Germanna Community College, which opened in 1970, is a two-year, public institution of higher education, serving a total headcount of about 13,000, including both students in academic courses and workforce development training, in the counties of Caroline, Culpeper, King George, Madison, Orange, Spotsylvania, Stafford and the city of Fredericksburg.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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WHAT: The New Horizons 2017 conference, the premier teaching and learning conference hosted by Virginia’s Community Colleges, will include remarks by two special allies of higher education: former Virginia First Lady and Secretary of Education, Anne Holton, and U.S. Senator, Mark R. Warner.

WHEN: Wednesday, April 12, 2017
12:45 pm (Hotel Roanoke Ballroom)
The Honorable Anne Holton
Former Virginia Secretary of Education, former Executive Director of the Great Expectations program for foster youth

Thursday, April 13, 2017
10:30 am (Hotel Roanoke Ballroom)
The Honorable Mark Warner
Virginia’s Senior U.S. Senator

WHERE: Hotel Roanoke
110 Shenandoah Avenue
Roanoke, VA 24016

WHO: In addition to Ms. Holton and Sen. Warner, more than 750 guests will participate in New Horizons, including State Board for Community College members, college presidents, community college leaders, local board members, faculty and staff.

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RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified four finalists for the position of president at New River Community College. The finalists were among more than 90 applicants from across the nation.

The four finalists include Dr. David L. Brand of Fayetteville, NC; Dr. Pat Huber of Pulaski, VA; Dr. Susan Short of Salem, VA; and Dr. Kristen A. Westover of Martinsville, VA.

“The New River Community College presidency is attracting some impressive and diverse talent from both inside and outside Virginia,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “The focus our colleges are placing on student success, our innovative approaches to providing short-term workforce training and our stability make us attractive to high-performing education leaders who are seeking their next career step.”

Dr. David L. Brand has worked in higher education for the last 18 years, following a 23-year career in the United States Army from which he retired at the rank of Major. Brand currently serves as the senior vice president and chief academic officer of Fayetteville Technical Community College in North Carolina, a role he has held since 2012. Prior to that, he worked as the director of the Department of Education, a senior civilian role at the U.S. Army Special Operations Command at Fort Bragg, NC. He also worked as the senior military training and education analyst at the Center for Army Lessons Learned, based at Fort Leavenworth, KS. Brand also worked as the chief academic officer and dean of the college at Bauder College in Atlanta. For six years he worked at DeVry University and Keller Graduate School of Management in Atlanta, where he began as a director of academic operations, rose to become the dean of the education center and then the regional director of operations. Brand earned a doctorate of education from the University of South Carolina; a master’s degree from the University of Houston and a bachelor’s degree from Troy State University.

Dr. Pat Huber has worked in education for 41 years, and has worked at New River Community College since 1988 where she began as an adjunct English instructor. Huber began working at NRCC full-time in 1992 as an assistant professor. From there, she rose through the ranks becoming an assistant division chair in 1999, a dean in 2005 and vice president for instruction and student services in 2007 – the position she holds today. Huber also served as the interim vice president for academic and student services at Wytheville Community College during the spring and summer of 2003. Huber earned a doctorate in community college leadership from Old Dominion University; a master’s degree from West Virginia University in Morgantown; a bachelor’s degree from Emory & Henry College in Emory, VA; and an associate degree from Wytheville Community College.

Dr. Susan Short has more than 36 years of experience working in higher education, with a blend of community college and university experience. She currently serves as the associate vice president for engagement at Virginia Tech – a position she has held since 2011. Short began her career as an admissions counselor at Shenandoah College and Conservatory in Winchester, VA. She later worked as a graduate counselor at Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania. Short worked for 20 years at Lord Fairfax Community College, in Winchester, VA, beginning in 1984 as a counselor/coordinator of student services. She also served as the director of student support services and the director of instruction and student services, ultimately rising to vice president of instruction and services. Short began working for Virginia Tech in 2004, first as the college’s Roanoke Center director and Commonwealth Campus Centers Program leader. She also worked as the college’s outreach program development director before rising to her current role. Short earned a doctorate of junior and community college education from Virginia Tech; a master’s degree from Shippensburg University; and two bachelor’s degrees from Shenandoah College and Conservatory.

Dr. Kristen A. Westover has more than 25 years of experience in higher education. She currently serves as the vice president for academic and student services at Patrick Henry Community College in Martinsville, a position she has held since 2011. Previously, she served as higher education program coordinator at the University of Texas in Austin, from 2009-2011. From 2008-2009, she also served as director of technical programs for the Kansas Board of Regents. In 2016, the Aspen Institute selected Westover for inclusion in the inaugural class of its national Aspen Presidential Fellows program. She holds a doctorate in education from Nova Southeastern University in Florida, and both a master’s degree in instructional technology and a bachelor’s degree from Fort Hays State University in Kansas.

The four finalists are vying to succeed Dr. Jack Lewis, who retired last year after serving NRCC for 42 years, including 17 as college president. Longtime Virginia community college leader, Dr. Charlie White, is currently serving at the college’s interim president.

The finalists will each spend a day or more on the campus of NRCC in April, to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

New River Community College, which opened in 1969, is a comprehensive community college located in Virginia’s New River Valley, serving an estimated 4,500 students in the counties of Montgomery, Floyd, Pulaski and Giles and the city of Radford.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – A committee of the State Board for Community Colleges will meet on Friday, March 31, 2017, at 12:15 p.m. at the VCCS System Office at 300 Arboretum Place, Suite 200, Richmond, VA to certify a panel of finalists under consideration to become the next President of New River Community College (NRCC).

Dr. Charlie White is serving as the college’s interim president. Dr. Jack Lewis, the college’s fifth president, retired in December after serving the college for more than 42 years, including 17 as president.

The national search to find New River’s next permanent president has attracted more than 90 applicants. The finalists certified by the Board will each spend a day on campus in April to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

New River Community College, which opened in 1969, is a comprehensive community college located in the New River Valley of Virginia, serving an estimated 4,500 students in the counties of Montgomery, Floyd, Pulaski and Giles, and the city of Radford.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges will convene its regular meeting on Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. in the Conference Center Gallery on the campus of J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College at 1651 E. Parham Rd., Richmond, VA 23228.

State Board Committees will meet on Wednesday, March 15, also in the Conference Center Gallery. The Academic, Student Affairs and Workforce Development Committee and the Budget and Finance Committee meet at 1:30 p.m. (Salons 3 and 2 respectively); the Facilities Committee and the Personnel Committee meet at 3 p.m. (Salon 2 and the Executive Board Room respectively); and the Audit Committee meets at 3:45 p.m. in Salon 3. An Executive Committee meeting will take place at the conclusion of all other committee meetings in the Executive Board Room.

Public comment will be received at each regular meeting of the board following the approval of minutes. Persons desiring to comment must notify the Chancellor’s Office in advance as specified by the VCCS Policy Manual.

A complete agenda for the State Board meeting is available at:  http://www.boarddocs.com/va/vccs/Board.nsf/Public.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE) has partnered with one of the nation’s largest retailers to respond to a growing need in the local labor market.

Thanks to a generous $80,000 grant from Walmart, the VFCCE is pledging to help hundreds of Richmond-area community college students pay for their certification exams.

The students targeted for assistance through the Workforce Credential Award initiative have completed their studies in a high-demand field like manufacturing, IT, or healthcare but may not be able to afford the cost of the certification exam (average cost of $200). The lack of certification delays their entry into the workforce.

The target population for the initiative are students at J. Sargeant Reynolds and John Tyler Community Colleges who have completed an industry-recognized and approved credit workforce training program but lack the financial resources to pay for the required certification exam.

Awards will be made on a first-come, first-served basis. The grant is expected to fund certification exams for an estimated 360 students. It is projected that 90% of the students who participate in the program will pass the exam and immediately enter the workforce in the Greater Richmond area.

Featured image (l to r): Dr. Sharon Morrissey, vice chancellor for academic services & research, Dr. Gary Rhodes, president, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, Glenn DuBois, chancellor, Peter Johnson, Walmart market manager (north Richmond), Dennis Dickson, Walmart market manager (south Richmond), Robert Davis, Walmart regional general manager, Dr. Ted Raspiller, president, John Tyler Community College

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education: Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students; helping more Virginia foster youth pursue and complete higher education through its Great Expectations program; and leading a partnership to improve rural Virginia’s education pipeline through the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/Foundation.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 300,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

 

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~Funds support solar/renewable workforce development at seven community colleges~

Richmond, Va. – Virginia’s Community Colleges are creating and expanding training programs for those seeking careers in renewable energy, thanks in part to a grant of $150,000 from the Dominion Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Dominion Virginia Power.

The grant to the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, or VFCCE, is helping seven community colleges fund new energy labs and equipment, allowing them to offer solar panel technician training and other renewable energy courses. The community colleges benefitting from the initiative are John Tyler, Northern Virginia, Tidewater, Virginia Highlands, Mountain Empire, Southside Virginia and Central Virginia.

Virginia aspires to be a leader in solar produced power, but needs to bolster its solar workforce to leverage significant investments being made in the sector. Installing and maintaining solar panels for solar farms, residential communities, commercial developments and other structures will require more skilled workers.

“Virginia can’t afford to miss out on a growing industry like solar energy because our workforce lacks the training and skills to seize the opportunity,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “We are delighted to work with Dominion to prepare the next generation of solar workers – another big example of our efforts to meet the needs of Virginia’s business community to help grow the Commonwealth’s economy.”

Virginia currently ranks 30th in the nation for solar energy production, but many companies, including Dominion Virginia Power, are forging ahead to add solar energy to the grid. Dominion is committed to developing 400 megawatts of renewable energy by 2020. It currently has 398 megawatts of large-scale solar facilities (enough to power 95,000 homes) under development or in operation in 12 Virginia localities. In January, the company completed three large-scale solar farms that employed 550 workers during construction.

“Virginia’s community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide the training for skilled workers in renewable energy fields,” said Hunter A. Applewhite, president of the Dominion Foundation. “We are excited to support these initiatives that will help boost job growth in Virginia.”

This workforce development project started in 2016. It will grow in 2017 to expand the curriculum to all community colleges that offer energy programs. The curriculum will also support expansion of energy programs at high schools through dual enrollment and usage of mobile solar labs.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE)
Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students; helping more Virginia foster youth pursue and complete higher education through its Great Expectations program; and leading a partnership to improve rural Virginia’s education pipeline through the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/giving.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges
Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 300,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

About Dominion
Dominion (NYSE: D), is one of the nation’s largest producers and transporters of energy. The Dominion Foundation is dedicated to improving the physical, social and economic well-being of the communities served by Dominion companies, including Dominion Virginia Power. The Foundation supports nonprofit causes that meet basic human needs, protect the environment, support education and promote community vitality. For more information, visit www.dom.com.

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