College Locator
If you are in Virginia, you are just 30 miles from a community college.
Here are the community colleges closest to
Home > News Archive

News Archive

Home > News Archive

  
	  
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 29047
            [post_author] => 3
            [post_date] => 2019-04-24 17:21:35
            [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-24 21:21:35
            [post_content] => 

RICHMOND – A committee of the State Board for Community Colleges has certified four finalists for the position of president at Eastern Shore Community College. The finalists were among 92 applicants from across the nation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The four finalists, in alphabetical order, are Dr. David E. Bowles of Hampton Roads, Virginia; Dr. Richard B. Pagan of Daniels, West Virginia; Dr. James M. Shaeffer of Norfolk, Virginia; and Dr. Mellissia M. Zanjani of Burlington Township, New Jersey.

“The Eastern Shore Community College presidency is attracting a diverse and dynamic collection of talented leaders from across the country,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “The college’s unique mixture of opportunities and challenges attracts innovative and creative leaders, excited about the chance to create the model 21st century rural community college, and that’s really promising for the entire Eastern Shore.”

Dr. David E. Bowles is currently in his fifth year as the director of the NASA Langley Research Center. He first joined that organization in 1980 as a researcher. Since then he has risen through its ranks, serving as a project manager, deputy director, associate director, and ultimately his current position, director. At NASA, Bowles oversaw the building and fostering of the agency’s workforce, updating its physical facilities, creating innovative programs, and collaborating with external partners – including Virginia’s Community Colleges – for academic programs and economic development efforts. He earned the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Service in 2017 and the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal in 2005 and 2015. He is a member of the Virginia Governor’s Aerospace Advisory Council, and a member of the Virginia General Assembly Joint Commission on Technology and Science 2017 committee charged with creating a “Blueprint for Growth of the Virginia Aviation and Aerospace Industry.” Bowles earned his bachelor’s degree, master’s degree and doctorate from Virginia Tech.

Dr. Richard B. Pagan has more than 20 years of higher education leadership experience following his retirement from the United States Air Force. Pagan joined Fairmont State University and its sister institution, Pierpont Community & Technical College in Fairmont, West Virginia as a professor and program coordinator in 1997. He moved to Guilford Technical Community College, in Jamestown, North Carolina, in 2011 to become the dean of the Transportation Technologies Division. Three years later, Pagan became the senior vice president and campus director of the National Aviation Academy in Bedford, Massachusetts. In 2016, He became the vice president for Academic Affairs at New River Community and Technical College in Beaver, West Virginia – the position he currently holds. Pagan earned two associate degrees from the Community College of the Air Force, a multi-campus program based at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama; a bachelor’s degree from Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia; a master’s degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, a multi-campus program based in Daytona Beach, Florida; and a doctorate from West Virginia University.

Dr. James M. Shaeffer has worked in education for 40 years, beginning as a middle school instructor in the Kansas City School District in 1979. Between 1984 and 1992, he worked at the University of Wyoming, Laramie, serving in several different positions. In 1992, he became an assistant professor and director of the School for Extended Studies and Public Studies at the University of Wyoming. Between 1996 and 2005, Shaeffer worked at the University of North Dakota, rising from an associate dean to an associate vice president. He moved to James Madison University in 2005 where he was an associate vice provost and an associate professor. He became the founding dean of the College of Continuing Education and Professional Development at Old Dominion University in 2014 – the position he currently holds. Shaeffer earned a bachelor’s degree from Iowa State University; a master’s degree from Kansas State University; and a doctorate from Northwestern University.

Dr. Mellissia M. Zanjani has nearly thirty years of higher education, nonprofit, and fundraising experience. She is also a 2010 Fellow of the Thomas Lakin Institute for Mentored Leadership. Zanjani began working at Towson University, in Maryland, in 1991 as a student advisor and director of the African-American Cultural Center Program. She joined the American Lung Association of New Jersey in 1993 as the northern regional program director. In 1998, she became the director of development and alumni relations for Harford Community College in Bel Air, Maryland. Zanjani moved to Tacoma Community College, in the State of Washington, in 2003 to become vice president for Institutional Advancement and foundation executive director. She held similar roles at Mercer County Community College in Trenton, New Jersey, in 2009; Georgian Court University in Lakewood, New Jersey, in 2013; and at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown in 2016. She became the vice president for Institutional Advancement at Lincoln University, in Lincoln University, Pennsylvania a year ago – the position she currently holds. Zanjani earned a bachelor’s degree from Chatham University, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; a master’s degree from Towson University; and a doctorate from Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon.

The four finalists seek to succeed Dr. Linda Thomas-Glover, the college’s forth president, who retired at the beginning of 2018 after serving in that role for nine years. Dr. Billy Greer has served as the college’s interim president since January, 2018. The finalists will each visit the college in late April and early May to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Eastern Shore Community College (ESCC) is a member of the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) and serves the residents of Accomack and Northampton Counties as a two-year institution of higher education. Originally a branch of the University of Virginia, the institution joined the Virginia Community College System in 1971. The college was accredited and granted membership in the Southern Association of College Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) in 1973 and moved to its current location in 1974. For more information, please visit es.vccs.edu.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Four Finalists for Eastern Shore Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-four-finalists-for-eastern-shore-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-24 19:49:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-24 23:49:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29047 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29049 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-04-24 17:34:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-24 21:34:21 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – A committee of the State Board for Community Colleges has certified two finalists for the position of president at Rappahannock Community College. The finalists were among 70 applicants from across the nation.

The finalists are Dr. Shannon L. Kennedy of Shelby, North Carolina and Dr. Mellissia M. Zanjani of Burlington Township, New Jersey.

“The presidency of Rappahannock Community College is a terrific opportunity for an innovative and hard-working executive who is prepared to lead a small, rural college to the next level,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “And that is being reflected back to us in a strong, diverse, and competitive pool of applicants. We are excited about the possibilities we see in talented individuals stepping forward here.”

Dr. Shannon L. Kennedy has nearly 25 years of higher education experience and is a former television journalist. She began her career at Gardner-Webb University, in Boiling Springs, North Carolina, in 1996 as a public relations assistant. She later worked at the college as an adjunct English professor and director of Foundation and Corporate Relations. In 2000, she moved to Cleveland Community College, in Shelby, North Carolina to become the director of public relations and grants development. There, Kennedy has been promoted several times to positions including associate dean, dean, executive vice president of Instruction and Student Development, and to executive vice president – the position in which she currently works. Further, she has served as an on-site reaffirmation committee member of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS-COC) for eight institutions over the past seven years. Kennedy earned a bachelor’s degree from Millersville University in Pennsylvania; a master’s degree from Appalachian State University; and a doctorate from North Carolina State University.

Dr. Mellissia M. Zanjani has nearly thirty years of higher education, nonprofit, and fundraising experience. She is also a 2010 Fellow of the Thomas Lakin Institute for Mentored Leadership. Zanjani began working at Towson University, in Maryland, in 1991 as a student advisor and director of the African-American Cultural Center Program. She joined the American Lung Association of New Jersey in 1993 as the northern regional program director. In 1998, she became the director of development and alumni relations for Harford Community College in Bel Air, Maryland. Zanjani moved to Tacoma Community College, in the State of Washington, in 2003 to become vice president for Institutional Advancement and foundation executive director. She held similar roles at Mercer County Community College in Trenton, New Jersey, in 2009; Georgian Court University in Lakewood, New Jersey, in 2013; and at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown in 2016. She became the vice president for Institutional Advancement at Lincoln University, in Lincoln University, Pennsylvania a year ago – the position she currently holds. Zanjani earned a bachelor’s degree from Chatham University, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; a master’s degree from Towson University; and a doctorate from Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon.

The two finalists seek to succeed Dr. Sissy Crowther, the college’s third president, who announced last fall that she is retiring at the end of June 2019, after serving in that role for more than 15 years. The finalists will individually visit the college in late April to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Rappahannock Community College has six distinct centers of learning, including two campuses, to serve the students in its service area, which includes the Middle Peninsula and Northern Neck regions of Virginia. For more information, please visit www.rappahannock.edu.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Two Finalists for Rappahannock Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-two-finalists-for-rappahannock-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-24 17:34:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-24 21:34:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29049 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29068 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-05-02 13:02:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-02 17:02:49 [post_content] =>

May 2, 2019

RICHMOND – Glenn DuBois, the chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that Dr. Shannon L. Kennedy, currently of Shelby, North Carolina has been hired to become the next president of Rappahannock Community College. Today’s announcement caps off a national search that attracted 70 applicants.

“Shannon has more than two decades of higher education experience with a heavy emphasis in academic affairs and workforce development training,” said DuBois. “She also offers years of experience as a college’s chief financial officer, finding ways to ensure the college operates efficiently and prioritizes resources toward serving students. We are grateful to add Shannon, and her family, to RCC and the VCCS.”

“We are delighted to welcome Dr. Shannon Kennedy to Rappahannock Community College and the communities and families that it serves,” said Ellen Matthews Davis, chair of the Rappahannock Community College local board. “Her wide-ranging experience and deep background in community colleges will serve us well. We look forward to many years of growth and success with Dr. Kennedy.”

Kennedy has nearly 25 years of higher education experience and is a former television journalist.

She began her career at Gardner-Webb University, in Boiling Springs, North Carolina, in 1996 as a public relations assistant. She later worked at the college as an adjunct English professor and director of Foundation and Corporate Relations.

In 2000, Kennedy moved to Cleveland Community College, in Shelby, North Carolina to become the director of public relations and grants development. There, Kennedy has been promoted several times to positions including associate dean, dean, executive vice president of Instruction and Student Development, and to executive vice president – the position in which she currently works.

Further, she has served as an on-site reaffirmation committee member of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS-COC) for eight institutions over the past seven years. Kennedy earned a bachelor’s degree from Millersville University in Pennsylvania; a master’s degree from Appalachian State University; and a doctorate from North Carolina State University.

“I’m very honored and excited to work with the great faculty and staff at Rappahannock Community College,” said Kennedy. “RCC is respected throughout the service area and provides incredible opportunities for Virginians in the Middle Peninsula and Northern Neck. The area is absolutely beautiful and my family and I are looking forward to relocating.”

Kennedy will succeed Dr. Sissy Crowther, the college’s third president, who announced last fall that she is retiring at the end of June 2019, after serving in that role for more than 15 years. Kennedy will assume RCC’s presidency at the beginning of July.

Rappahannock Community College has six distinct centers of learning, including two campuses, to serve the students in its service area, which includes the Middle Peninsula and Northern Neck regions of Virginia. For more information, please visit www.rappahannock.edu.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Dr. Shannon L. Kennedy Hired to Become Next President of Rappahannock Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-shannon-l-kennedy-hired-to-become-next-president-of-rappahannock-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-09-27 11:58:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-09-27 15:58:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29068 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29106 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-05-14 13:00:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-14 17:00:50 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – Glenn DuBois, the chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that Dr. James M. Shaeffer of Norfolk, Virginia; has been hired to become the next president of Eastern Shore Community College. Shaeffer’s selection is the result of a national search that attracted 92 applicants.

[caption id="attachment_29107" align="alignleft" width="214"] Schaeffer[/caption]

“Jim’s career in higher education has spanned more than 30 years, with a heavy emphasis in workforce development training with multi-state experience,” said DuBois. “There is a unique set of challenges and opportunities at Eastern Shore Community College and we’re excited to see what Jim’s nontraditional path to the presidency can help us achieve there.”

“Our board is very pleased to hire Dr. Shaeffer after a highly competitive and thorough four-month search, vetting and selection process,” said Jeffrey B. Holland, chair of the Eastern Shore Community College local board. “Jim Shaeffer brings an exceptional combination of experience, talent, energy and vision to our college. Jim’s portfolio of skills and resourcefulness will be a catalyst for the innovative transformation for the institution.”

Shaeffer has worked in education for 40 years, beginning as a middle school instructor in the Kansas City School District in 1979.

Between 1984 and 1992, he worked at the University of Wyoming, Laramie, serving in several different positions. In 1992, he became an assistant professor and director of the School for Extended Studies and Public Studies at the University of Wyoming. He was elevated to associate professor in 1994, and became the division head of the Extended Credit Programs in the university’s School of Extended Studies and Public Service.

Shaeffer worked at the University of North Dakota, beginning in 1996, rising from an associate dean to an associate vice president. He moved to James Madison University in 2005 where he was an associate vice provost and an associate professor. He became the founding dean of the College of Continuing Education and Professional Development at Old Dominion University in 2014 – the position he currently holds.

Shaeffer earned a bachelor’s degree from Iowa State University; a master’s degree from Kansas State University; and a doctorate from Northwestern University.

“I am thrilled to have this opportunity. During my on-campus interview I was struck by the connection the community shares with the college, the sense of pride the students have for ESCC, and the dedication the faculty and staff demonstrate for the institution’s mission,” said Shaeffer. “As the finishing touches are placed on the college’s new academic building, I think it will become a symbol of a renewal for ESCC. Together, I believe we can create a new model for an effective and efficient 21st century small college that elevates the communities it serves.”

Shaeffer will succeed Dr. Linda Thomas-Glover, the college’s fourth president, who retired at the beginning of 2018 after serving in that role for nine years. Dr. Billy Greer has served as the college’s interim president since January, 2018. Shaeffer will assume the position in the beginning of July.

Eastern Shore Community College (ESCC) is a member of the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) and serves the residents of Accomack and Northampton Counties as a two-year institution of higher education. Originally a branch of the University of Virginia, the institution joined the Virginia Community College System in 1971. The college was accredited and granted membership in the Southern Association of College Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) in 1973 and moved to its current location in 1974. For more information, please visit https://es.vccs.edu.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Dr. James M. Shaeffer Hired to Become Next President of Eastern Shore Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-james-m-shaeffer-hired-to-become-next-president-of-eastern-shore-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-28 11:16:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-28 15:16:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29106 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29113 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-05-16 10:31:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-05-16 14:31:33 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND —The State Board for Community Colleges, by a unanimous vote, elected to maintain the current in-state tuition and mandatory fees for the 2019-2020 academic year. The Board’s decision means tuition will remain at today’s rate of $154 per credit hour, and keeps community college tuition and mandatory fees at approximately one-third of the comparable costs of attending Virginia’s public four-year universities.

“The Virginia General Assembly deserves a great deal of credit for helping us avoid a tuition increase,” said Robin Sullenberger, chair of the State Board for Community Colleges. “Their decision to increase General Fund appropriations gave us the resources necessary to meet the inevitable operating expense increases without asking our students to pay more. We applaud their efforts during the 2019 legislative session.”

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION
Further, the State Board maintained the existing tuition rate for out-of-state students, which is $351.60 per credit hour. The Board approved a technical fee increase for capital cost recovery that applies only to out-of-state students who make up approximately five percent of the total enrollment of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

TUITION DIFFERENTIALS
For the second year in a row, there were no increases to the tuition differential rates charged at eight of Virginia’s 23 community colleges (Germanna, John Tyler, Northern Virginia, Piedmont Virginia, Reynolds, Tidewater, Thomas Nelson, and Virginia Western). Tuition differential rates allow colleges to address unique and specific institutional priorities.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Holds the Line on Community College Tuition for 2019-2020 Academic Year [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-holds-the-line-on-community-college-tuition-for-2019-2020-academic-year [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-05-21 12:45:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-05-21 16:45:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29113 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29283 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-07-25 23:25:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-07-26 03:25:17 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – July 25, 2019 - Virginia’s Community Colleges are making additional investments in their successful FastForward Virginia workforce training programs to help more Virginians earn workforce credentials for new careers and better provide for themselves and their families.

The Virginia Community College System (VCCS) has directed $2.75 million in FastForward Workforce Training Grants to community colleges around the commonwealth to develop new and expand existing high-demand training programs.

“These grants reaffirm our commitment to helping Virginians start, or re-start their careers” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “More than 16,000 postsecondary credentials have been awarded since FastForward launched three years ago and Virginia’s workforce is stronger because of it. Our graduates typically boost their take home pay by 25-50%, in a matter of weeks not years. We want to make sure every Virginian knows about this life-changing opportunity.”

“This capacity building will touch every region of Virginia and help build a skilled workforce for years to come,” said Sharon Morrissey, VCCS senior vice chancellor for academic and workforce programs. “This investment allows our colleges to increase their capacity for providing FastForward training through instructor salaries, materials and supplies, curriculum development and much more.”

Training opportunities the grants will provide for include:

Eastern Shore Community College will begin a medical scribe credential program, helping train new medical professionals to address a need of local employers.

Piedmont Virginia Community College will expand its capacity to train welding students by 50 percent, yielding 150 student per year.

• The Certified Production Technician program at Virginia Highlands Community College will assist local manufacturers with workforce demands.

Lord Fairfax Community College will expand its electrical trades program and HVAC training.

• Dabney D. Lancaster Community College will respond to immediate shortages among regional employers for skilled trade labor through a new Industrial Maintenance Mechanic program.

The following is a full list of workforce training opportunities made possible by the FastForward Workforce Training Grants. (Media representatives are invited to contact local community college public information officers for more details.)

Blue Ridge Community College $160,100 for Heavy Equipment Operator Levels I and II, and Machining

Central Virginia Community College $172,907 for Backflow Prevention Device Certification, Certified Clinical Medical Assistant, Emergency Medical Technician, NCCER Core & Electrical 1, 2, 3 & 4, Phlebotomy Technician, and Certified Welder

Community College Workforce Alliance $160,135 for NCCER Electrical Level 1, Manufacturing Technician Level 1, NCCER HVAC Level 1, Certified Logistics Associate, benefitting Richmond-area students of John Tyler and Reynolds community colleges

Dabney S Lancaster Community College $173,143 for Electrical and Commercial Driver’s License – B; the college intends to update training for Phlebotomy and Pharmacy Technician and offer a new program: Industrial Maintenance Mechanic

Eastern Shore Community College $23,965 for Electrician Level 2 and an intended medical scribe program

Germanna Community College $197,879 for NCCER Core Craft; additional programming options through the National Institute for Metalworking Skills are planned

Lord Fairfax Community College $182,466 for Electrical and HVAC

Mountain Empire Community College $187,151 for Welding and Fabrication (The Custom Creation Shop)

New River Community College $33,500 for Apartment Maintenance Technician and EKG/Phlebotomy Technician

Northern Virginia Community College $75,000 for CompTIA A+, CompTIA Security+ and CompTIA Network+

Patrick Henry Community College $62,853 for NCCER Plumbing Level 1 and NCCER HVAC Level 2

Paul D. Camp Community College $200,000 for Fast Track Welding (Certified Welder)

Piedmont Virginia Community College $199,982 for Certified Nurse Aide, Medication Aide, Clinical Medical Assistant and Welding

Rappahannock Community College $120,013 for Customer Service and Sales, CNC Milling: Programming Setup and Operations- NIMS, CNC Turning: Programming Setup and Operations – NIMS, Pipe Welding - AWS - Certified Welder and Commercial Driver License

Southside Virginia Community College $187,500 for HVAC

Southwest Virginia Community College $190,000 for Welding and Heavy Equipment Operator

Thomas Nelson Community College $33,536 for Electrical Level 1, Electrical Level 2 and HVAC Level 1

Tidewater Community College $179,493 for NCCER Core expansion and Advanced Medical Billing and Coding

Virginia Highlands Community College $82,708 for Certified Nurse Aide and Certified Production Technician

Virginia Western Community College $105,482 for Certified Nurse Aide, Medication Aide, and Heavy Equipment Operator

Wytheville Community College $174,131 for a planned Automotive Technician program
Information about FastForward Virginia is available at workforce development offices on Virginia Community College campuses statewide, and at https://www.fastforwardva.org/.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Virginia’s Community Colleges investment expands training opportunities for job seekers [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virginias-community-colleges-investment-expands-training-opportunities-for-job-seekers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-07-25 23:25:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-07-26 03:25:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29283 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29370 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-09-18 15:56:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-18 19:56:52 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA). The finalists were among 80 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists, in alphabetical order, are Dr. Paul Broadie II (left) of Orange, Connecticut; Dr. Anne M. Kress of Rochester, New York; and Dr. Joaquín G. Martínez of Hollywood, Florida.

“Northern Virginia Community College is one of our nation’s largest, most diverse, and most dynamic community colleges,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “That’s reflected in the pool of candidates who applied for this presidency and the group of finalists moving on to the next step. These are seasoned and successful higher education leaders, and each of them is ready for the unique opportunities and challenges of leading Northern Virginia Community College. We’re excited for the college community to learn more about what they offer.”

Dr. Paul Broadie II is currently the president of two, independent Connecticut institutions: Gateway Community College in New Haven and Housatonic Community College in Bridgeport. He has nearly 30 years of higher education experience. Broadie began his career in 1990 as an admissions counselor at Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, New York. Two years later, at the same institution, he became an assistant coordinator of one of the college’s extension centers. He moved on to the State University of New York (SUNY) at New Paltz where he became an admissions advisor in 1997; an academic support coordinator nearly a year later; and an assistant dean of admissions/multi-cultural recruitment coordinator in 2000. Broadie became the director of the Ossining Extension Center for Westchester Community College, in Valhalla, New York, in 2001. He moved to Orange County Community College, in Middletown, New York, where he became the associate vice president of extension centers in 2002, and the vice president for Student Services in 2005. He became the president of Housatonic Community College in 2015, and took on the additional role of president at Gateway Community College in 2017. Broadie earned a bachelor’s degree from Mercy College; a master’s degree from Long Island University, in Brooklyn, New York; and a doctorate from Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado.

Dr. Anne M. Kress is currently the president of Monroe Community College in Rochester, New York. She has 30 years of community college experience. Her career began in 1989 at Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville, Florida as an adjunct instructor of English. She rose through the ranks at that institution becoming an associate professor in 1994; a department chair in 1998; the Title III project director in 2000; an associate vice president in 2002; and the provost and vice president for Academic Affairs in 2005. She became the president of Monroe Community College in 2009. Kress is serving her second term on the board of directors of the American Association of Community Colleges and as a member of the Presidents’ Trust of the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Kress earned two bachelor’s degrees, a master’s degree, and a doctorate from the University of Florida.

Dr. Joaquín G. Martínez is currently the district vice provost for Institutional Effectiveness at Miami Dade College. He has more than 25 years of education experience, including a decade of community college experience. Martínez began as a high school Spanish, French, and Italian teacher in Miami-Dade County Schools in 1993. He became an adjunct professor at Nova Southeastern University, in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, in 2004. He moved to Albizu University, in Doral, Florida, where he became an associate professor in 2005; and the professor, director of the college’s School of Education in 2006. He moved to Miami Dade College in 2010 to become a department chair and steadily rose through the institution’s ranks becoming an associate dean and then associate provost in 2013; the dean of Faculty & Student Services in 2015; president of the Hialeah Campus in 2016; and president of the Wolfson Campus and Virtual College in 2017. This past summer, he assumed the district vice provost role he holds today. Martínez earned a bachelor’s degree from Middlebury College in Vermont; a master’s degree from Nova Southeastern University; and a doctorate from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida.

The three finalists seek to become the college’s sixth permanent president, and will succeed Dr. Melvyn D. Schiavelli, who has served as the college’s interim president since spring. The finalists will each visit the college in the coming weeks to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Established in 1964, Northern Virginia Community College is the largest public institution of higher education in the Commonwealth of Virginia and one of America's largest community colleges. NOVA enrolls more than 75,000 students at its six campuses in Alexandria, Annandale, Loudoun, Manassas, Springfield and Woodbridge, and through the Extended Learning Institute.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Three Finalists for Northern Virginia Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-three-finalists-for-northern-virginia-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-09-18 15:56:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-09-18 19:56:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29370 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29372 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-09-18 15:57:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-18 19:57:18 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Virginia Highlands Community College. The finalists were among nearly 70 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists, in alphabetical order, are Dr. Marcia Conston of Charlotte, North Carolina; Dr. Adam C, Hutchison (center) of Elm Mott, Texas; and Dr. Herbert H.J. Riedel of Andalusia, Alabama.

“This presidential search is attracting an impressive breadth and depth of talented candidates and that’s no surprise,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “Virginia Highlands Community College is poised for tremendous progress. The college has a top-quality faculty and staff and it serves a dynamic rural community. I’m excited about what the future has in store for VHCC.”

Dr. Marcia Conston has worked in higher education for more than 30 years. She began her career as the director of Institutional Research at Jackson State University, in Mississippi in 1987. She went to Benedict College, in Columbia, South Carolina in 1994 to become the vice president for Institutional Effectiveness. In 2001, she became the vice president for Enrollment and Student Success Services at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte, North Carolina – the position at which she currently works. Conston has also taught throughout her career, serving as a part-time associate professor at Benedict College in 1995-1996, and as an adjunct instructor at Wingate University for two years beginning in 2012. As an evaluator for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), Conston has evaluated 14 institutions for reaccreditation, including two Virginia community colleges. She holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Jackson State University in Mississippi; a master’s degree from Hood Theological Seminary in Salisbury, North Carolina; and a doctorate from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Dr. Adam C. Hutchison has nearly 20 years of higher education experience. He spent most of his early career at Texas State Technical College (TSTC) in Harlingen, Texas, where he served as an Aviation Maintenance Technology senior instructor and department chair (2000); associate vice president of its Corporate College (2006); the college’s chief of staff (2009); and its provost and vice president for Student Learning (2011). Hutchison moved to the TSTC in Waco, Texas in 2014 where he worked as the college’s provost and vice president for Student Learning for eight months before transferring to the TSTC System Office to become the associate vice chancellor for Student Learning. In 2016, he returned to TSTC Waco to be the college’s provost. Hutchison holds an associate and bachelor’s degree from Bob Jones University in Greenville, South Carolina; a master’s degree from Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia; and a doctorate from Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia.

Dr. Herbert H.J. Riedel has worked in higher education for 35 years. He began as a lecturer at Bowling Green State University, in Ohio, in 1984. A year later, he became an assistant professor at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1992 Riedel became a faculty member at Trident Technical College in Charleston. He moved to Tri-County Technical College in Pendleton, South Carolina where he became a department head in 1998 and a division chair in 2000. Riedel moved to the University of Central Florida, in Orlando, Florida, in 2004 to become the deputy director of the Nanoscience Technology Center. In 2005, he became the vice president for Instruction and Student Development at Northeast Texas Community College in Mt. Pleasant, Texas. He became the president of Lurleen B. Wallace Community College in Andalusia, Alabama in 2009– the position from which he recently retired. Riedel holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Pretoria in Pretoria, South Africa; and a master’s degree and doctorate from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada.

The three finalists seek to become the college’s seventh permanent president, and will succeed Dr. Charlie White, who has served as the college’s interim president for nearly a year. The finalists will each visit the college in in the coming weeks to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Virginia Highlands Community College provides high-quality education and related services for residents throughout its Southwest Virginia region, which includes the city of Bristol, Virginia; Washington County and the western part of Smyth County. VHCC is committed to teaching, learning & community building, and serves more than 2500 students, offering more than 80 academic areas of study.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Three Finalists for Virginia Highlands Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-three-finalists-for-virginia-highlands-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-09-18 15:57:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-09-18 19:57:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29372 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29401 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-09-27 11:14:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-27 15:14:43 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Tidewater Community College (TCC). The finalists were among 80 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists, in alphabetical order (l to r) are: Dr. Andrew W. Bowne of Yorktown Indiana; Dr. Marcia Conston of Charlotte, North Carolina; and Dr. Ty A. Stone of Watertown, New York.

“Among the qualities we seek for this presidency are an innovative and flexible leadership style; a skilled and experienced strategist; and a vision to boost the college’s enrollment trends – and these candidates each offer a strong, yet distinct blend of those traits,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “TCC’s size and reputation attracted an impressive pool of applicants and we are excited about these finalists.”

Dr. Andrew W. Bowne has worked in higher education for nearly 20 years. Following a corporate career, Bowne began his higher education career as an adjunct instructor in 2000 at Davenport University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, a position he held for two years. That same year, he began as an adjunct instructor at Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, which he held for 12 years. He moved to Grand Rapids Community College where he became the executive director of Workforce Training & Economic Development in 2003, and the associate vice president for College Advancement in 2005. Bowne moved to Ivy Tech Community College in Muncie, Indiana to become the chancellor of the East Central Region in 2012. Two years later, his responsibilities grew as he was named chancellor, East Central and Richmond Regions. In 2016, he moved to Ivy Tech’s system office in Indianapolis and became senior vice president/COO – the position he holds today. Bowne holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree, and a doctorate from Western Michigan University.

Dr. Marcia Conston has worked in higher education for more than 30 years. She began her career as the director of Institutional Research at Jackson State University, in Mississippi in 1987. She went to Benedict College, in Columbia, South Carolina in 1994 to become the vice president for Institutional Effectiveness. In 2001, she became the vice president for Enrollment and Student Success Services at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte, North Carolina – the position at which she currently works. Conston has also taught throughout her career, serving as a part-time associate professor at Benedict College in 1995-1996, and as an adjunct instructor at Wingate University for two years beginning in 2012. As an evaluator for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), Conston has evaluated 14 institutions for reaccreditation, including two Virginia community colleges. She holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Jackson State University in Mississippi; a master’s degree from Hood Theological Seminary in Salisbury, North Carolina; and a doctorate from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Dr. Ty A. Stone has more than 12 years of higher education experience, following careers in the corporate and nonprofit sector, as well as being an air traffic controller. Stone’s higher education career began at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio where she began as an assistant professor in 2004 and served as a project director of the Ohio Minority Health Institute in 2006. Following two years of service as the CFO of the YWCA in Dayton, Ohio, Stone moved to Sinclair Community College in Dayton in 2010. She spent two years at the director of Business Services before becoming the vice president of Business Operations in 2012 and the vice president for Strategic Initiatives in 2016. She became the president of Jefferson Community College, in Watertown New York, in 2017 – the position she currently holds. Stone earned a bachelor’s degree from Columbia Union College, in Tacoma Park, Maryland; an MBA from Trinity University in Washington, D.C.; and a doctorate from Capella University in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The three finalists seek to become the college’s sixth permanent president, and will succeed Dr. Gregory T. DeCinque, who has served as the college’s interim president since July, 2018. The finalists will each visit the college in the coming weeks to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

As a part of Virginia’s Community College System, TCC serves the 1.1 million residents of the South Hampton Roads area with four fully comprehensive campuses and five regional centers. As the second largest community college in Virginia, TCC enrolls more than 32,000 students. Founded in 1968, the college is the largest provider of higher education and workforce development training and services in the region.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 280,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Three Finalists for Tidewater Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-three-finalists-for-tidewater-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-09-27 11:14:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-09-27 15:14:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29401 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29406 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-09-27 12:11:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-09-27 16:11:23 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Tidewater Community College (TCC). The finalists were among 80 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists, in alphabetical order (l to r above) are: Dr. Andrew W. Bowne of Yorktown Indiana; Dr. Marcia Conston of Charlotte, North Carolina; and Dr. Ty A. Stone of Watertown, New York.

“Among the qualities we seek for this presidency are an innovative and flexible leadership style; a skilled and experienced strategist; and a vision to boost the college’s enrollment trends – and these candidates each offer a strong, yet distinct blend of those traits,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “TCC’s size and reputation attracted an impressive pool of applicants and we are excited about these finalists.”

Dr. Andrew W. Bowne has worked in higher education for nearly 20 years. Following a corporate career, Bowne began his higher education career as an adjunct instructor in 2000 at Davenport University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, a position he held for two years. That same year, he began as an adjunct instructor at Cornerstone University in Grand Rapids, which he held for 12 years. He moved to Grand Rapids Community College where he became the executive director of Workforce Training & Economic Development in 2003, and the associate vice president for College Advancement in 2005. Bowne moved to Ivy Tech Community College in Muncie, Indiana to become the chancellor of the East Central Region in 2012. Two years later, his responsibilities grew as he was named chancellor, East Central and Richmond Regions. In 2016, he moved to Ivy Tech’s system office in Indianapolis and became senior vice president/COO – the position he holds today. Bowne holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree, and a doctorate from Western Michigan University.

Dr. Marcia Conston has worked in higher education for more than 30 years. She began her career as the director of Institutional Research at Jackson State University, in Mississippi in 1987. She went to Benedict College, in Columbia, South Carolina in 1994 to become the vice president for Institutional Effectiveness. In 2001, she became the vice president for Enrollment and Student Success Services at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte, North Carolina – the position at which she currently works. Conston has also taught throughout her career, serving as a part-time associate professor at Benedict College in 1995-1996, and as an adjunct instructor at Wingate University for two years beginning in 2012. As an evaluator for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), Conston has evaluated 14 institutions for reaccreditation, including two Virginia community colleges. She holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Jackson State University in Mississippi; a master’s degree from Hood Theological Seminary in Salisbury, North Carolina; and a doctorate from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Dr. Ty A. Stone has more than 12 years of higher education experience, following careers in the corporate and nonprofit sector, as well as being an air traffic controller. Stone’s higher education career began at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio where she began as an assistant professor in 2004 and served as a project director of the Ohio Minority Health Institute in 2006. Following two years of service as the CFO of the YWCA in Dayton, Ohio, Stone moved to Sinclair Community College in Dayton in 2010. She spent two years at the director of Business Services before becoming the vice president of Business Operations in 2012 and the vice president for Strategic Initiatives in 2016. She became the president of Jefferson Community College, in Watertown New York, in 2017 – the position she currently holds. Stone earned a bachelor’s degree from Columbia Union College, in Tacoma Park, Maryland; an MBA from Trinity University in Washington, D.C.; and a doctorate from Capella University in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The three finalists seek to become the college’s sixth permanent president, and will succeed Dr. Gregory T. DeCinque, who has served as the college’s interim president since July, 2018. The finalists will each visit the college in the coming weeks to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

As a part of Virginia’s Community College System, TCC serves the 1.1 million residents of the South Hampton Roads area with four fully comprehensive campuses and five regional centers. As the second largest community college in Virginia, TCC enrolls more than 32,000 students. Founded in 1968, the college is the largest provider of higher education and workforce development training and services in the region.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 280,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Three Finalists for Tidewater Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 29406 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-10-15 15:54:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-10-15 19:54:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29406 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )