College Locator
If you are in Virginia, you are just 30 miles from a community college.
Here are the community colleges closest to
Home > News Archive

News Archive

Home > News Archive

  
	  
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 28443
            [post_author] => 3
            [post_date] => 2018-09-18 10:00:47
            [post_date_gmt] => 2018-09-18 14:00:47
            [post_content] => 

Select Virginia Community Colleges will create Institutes of Excellence for major infrastructure industries

RICHMOND—Virginia’s Community Colleges today announced a $4 million economic investment over the next two years to support curriculum development and FastForward workforce training in the rapidly growing fields of utility-scale solar energy and heavy construction. Select community colleges will develop programs that can be expanded across the commonwealth as the demand grows for skilled workers in these fields.

VIRGINIA SOLAR WORKFORCE INITIATIVE

Southside Virginia Community College (SVCC) will receive funds to work with businesses in the energy industry to develop and deploy the Virginia Solar Workforce Initiative, a first-in-the-state curriculum and training program for the utility-scale solar industry. The need for utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) installers, who earn an average starting salary of $42,000-50,000, is emerging in Virginia, and the U.S. Department of Energy reports the solar energy sector is poised for robust growth.

“The Virginia Solar Workforce Initiative is an exceptional example of a public-private partnership,” said Dr. Al Roberts, president of Southside Virginia Community College. “These jobs represent an excellent opportunity for Virginians to be a part of this dynamic, high-growth industry, and we’re excited to partner with industry leaders in the utility-scale solar field, the Maryland-DC-Delaware-Virginia Solar Energy Industries Association, to create this program.”

VCCS HEAVY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS

The new grants also will increase access to FastForward training for workers in the heavy construction industry. Lord Fairfax Community College (LFCC), Piedmont Virginia Community College (PVCC), and Germanna Community College (GCC) will team up to develop a curriculum and statewide training capabilities for courses that support Virginia’s development sector.

In partnership with the Heavy Construction Contractors Association (HCCA) and the Virginia Asphalt Association (VAA), the colleges will establish online access to training programs in the principles and practices of road building and other major infrastructure projects.

“The expanded initiative provides an opportunity to truly create a pipeline of current and future employees who will reap the rewards of a well-paid and rewarding career pathway,” said Ken Garrison, Executive Director of the Heavy Construction Contractors Association. “We have worked collaboratively with LFCC to build the pilot program and our firms benefited from hiring the graduates.”

“We look forward to working in partnership with our sister colleges to scale and expand the program in order to serve more employers and give access to more job seekers to obtain these high demand industry credentials,” said Kimberly Blosser, president of LFCC.

The average starting salary in Virginia for heavy equipment operators is $43,000 a year.

Since July of 2016, Virginians who trained in FastForward programs at community colleges have earned more than 11,000 valuable industry recognized workforce credentials. FastForward training programs are specifically geared toward the needs of local businesses and offer students affordable access to new careers in weeks or months instead of semesters and years.

“FastForward is benefitting both the individuals who earn credentials in high demand fields and the businesses that are eager to hire skilled employees,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “These strategic investments will bolster those talent pipelines feeding these emerging industries and prepare even more people for these good-paying careers.”

Find out more about FastForward at www.fastforwardva.org.

[post_title] => Virginia’s Community Colleges expand FastForward workforce training in rapidly growing solar energy, heavy construction sectors [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virginias-community-colleges-expand-fastforward-workforce-training-in-rapidly-growing-solar-energy-heavy-construction-sectors [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-09-18 14:05:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-09-18 18:05:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=28443 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28544 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2018-10-23 12:00:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-10-23 16:00:04 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – Dr. Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that he is naming Dr. Charlie White the interim president of Virginia Highlands Community College (VHCC), effective immediately.

[caption id="attachment_28545" align="alignright" width="125"] White[/caption]

White is a veteran higher education leader who has spent much of his career working at Virginia’s Community Colleges, including eight years as the president of Wytheville Community College (WCC). He also served recently as the interim president of New River Community College (NRCC).

“Charlie is a seasoned community college president who knows how to bring people together and move an institution forward,” said DuBois. “He was born in Southwest Virginia, grew up there, and spent his career there so he understands the region. Charlie is the right person to keep Virginia Highlands focused on our students moving forward as we prepare to search for the college’s next permanent president.”

Dr. White has worked in various positions within Virginia’s Community College (VCCS) since 1971 when he joined the NRCC faculty. He chaired the Division of Arts and Sciences at NRCC from 1983-1998, and was a professor of Biology and chair of the Math and Science Division prior to that. White was also NRCC’s vice president for instruction and student services, as well as interim vice chancellor for academic services and research in the VCCS office during 2005 before serving as president of Wytheville Community College from 2006-2015.

White holds a doctorate from the University of Tennessee and bachelor’s and master’s degrees from East Tennessee State University. He also holds an associate degree from Hiwassee College in Tennessee.

White replaces Dr. Gene Couch who is retiring after four years as VHCC president.

A national search will begin in early 2019 to hire the next VHCC president. That process typically takes six to nine months to complete.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

[post_title] => Veteran Community College Leader Named Interim President of Virginia Highlands Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => veteran-community-college-leader-named-interim-president-of-virginia-highlands-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-10-23 12:39:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-10-23 16:39:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=28544 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28609 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2018-11-08 15:59:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-11-08 20:59:04 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – Dr. Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that he is naming Dr. Betty Jo Foster as the interim president of Danville Community College (DCC), effective at the beginning of 2019.

[caption id="attachment_28610" align="alignleft" width="240"] Foster[/caption]

Foster is a familiar face throughout the Danville region having worked at DCC for 36 years before retiring as the college’s academic vice president in 2004. She has also served stints as the interim president of Central Virginia Community College, in Lynchburg, and as the interim president and CEO of the Danville Pittsylvania County Chamber of Commerce.

“Betty Jo has earned a reputation as an outstanding leader in both higher education and in the business community,” said DuBois. “She is strongly-positioned to keep the college focused on our students as we move forward and launch our national search for the college’s next permanent president.”

Foster began as a DCC professor in 1971. She ascended through the college’s ranks, becoming its vice president for academic and student services in 1993 – a position she held through her retirement in 2004. She served as the interim president of CVCC for six months in 1998. Beginning in August 2017, she served as the interim president and CEO of the Danville/Pittsylvania County Chamber of Commerce for five months. Foster holds a bachelor’s degree from Radford University; a master’s degree from Virginia Tech; and a doctorate from NOVA University.

“I consider this opportunity to be both an honor and a privilege. It’s like coming home,” said Foster. “So much of my professional life has occurred on the campus of DCC. I appreciate the chance to return there once again and work with the faculty, staff, and students that make it such a special place. I believe the college is in a strong position and will attract terrific candidates in the next presidential search.”

Foster replaces Dr. Bruce Scism who announced in September that he is retiring at the end of the calendar year after more than five years as DCC president.

A national search will begin in early 2019 to hire the next DCC president. That process typically takes six to nine months to complete.

About Danville Community College: Founded in 1966, Danville Community College is a two-year institution of higher education under the statewide Virginia Community College System. DCC's service area includes the City of Danville, Pittsylvania County, and Halifax County. For more information about the college’s more than 100 programs of study, visit www.danville.edu.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Veteran Community College Leader Named Interim President of Danville Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => veteran-community-college-leader-named-interim-president-of-danville-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-11-08 23:04:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-11-09 04:04:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=28609 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28709 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2018-12-18 11:23:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-12-18 16:23:05 [post_content] =>

(Richmond) – Glenn Dubois, the chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges made the following statement today on the announcement that Dr. Scott Ralls, president of Northern Virginia Community College (NVCC), has been named the next president of Wake Technical Community College in North Carolina:

“As both a colleague and a friend, I congratulate Scott Ralls on his new opportunity and wish him well as he and his family return to North Carolina. Since assuming the Northern Virginia Community College presidency more than three years ago, Scott has made a positive and lasting impact – bolstering the college’s transfer partnership with George Mason University through the ADVANCE program and fostering vital relationships across the region’s business community.

“Soon, we will announce an interim president for NVCC. Early next year, we will conduct a national search for a dynamic and creative higher education leader to become the college’s next permanent president and build on its legacy of innovation and success in serving a vibrant and diverse community.”

[post_title] => Statement of Glenn DuBois, Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges On the Departure of NVCC President Scott Ralls [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => statement-of-glenn-dubois-chancellor-of-virginias-community-colleges-on-the-departure-of-nvcc-president-scott-ralls [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-12-18 11:23:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-12-18 16:23:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=28709 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28840 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-02-12 11:07:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-02-12 16:07:50 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, Dr. Glenn DuBois, announced today that Dr. Melvyn D. Schiavelli will become the interim President of Northern Virginia Community College effective March 15, 2019. Schiavelli currently serves as the executive vice president of NOVA, overseeing Academic & Student Services. This appointment marks the second time that Schiavelli will be the college’s interim president.

[caption id="attachment_28841" align="alignright" width="300"] Dr. Melvyn D. Schiavelli[/caption]

“It is a luxury to be able to turn to such an experienced and trusted leader for this interim assignment,” said DuBois. “Mel has served the last two NOVA presidents with distinction and continues to bolster his impressive reputation as a seasoned and effective higher education leader.”

Schiavelli earned his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. He taught at the College of William & Mary, the University of Utah, and the University of Delaware during his 50-year career in higher education. He served as a faculty member, department chair, dean, provost and interim president at the College of William & Mary and as provost at the University of Delaware. More recently he served as the founding president of the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology.

“I appreciate the confidence shown in me by the Chancellor by this appointment. NOVA is truly one of stars in the commonwealth’s higher education firmament and being asked to lead it again is indeed an honor,” said Schiavelli.

The VCCS soon will launch a national search for the next permanent president of Northern Virginia Community College, a process which typically takes six to eight months to complete. Schiavelli, as interim president, will not be a candidate in that search.

About Northern Virginia Community College: The largest institution of higher education in the Commonwealth of Virginia and one of America's largest community colleges. NOVA enrolls more than 75,000 students at its six campuses in Alexandria, Annandale, Loudoun, Manassas, Springfield and Woodbridge, and through the Extended Learning Institute. For more information about NOVA and its programs or services, visit the College's Web site, www.nvcc.edu.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Dr. Melvyn D. Schiavelli Named Interim President of Northern Virginia Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-melvyn-d-schiavelli-named-interim-president-of-northern-virginia-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-02-12 11:07:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-02-12 16:07:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=28840 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28928 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-03-20 15:32:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-03-20 19:32:21 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Danville Community College. The finalists were among 80 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists, in alphabetical order, are (left to right below): Dr. Thomas G. Coley of Granger, IA; Dr. Jacqueline M. Gill of Lee’s Summit, MO; and Dr. Daniel Mosser of La Plata, MD.

“The Danville Community College presidency is attracting a diverse and dynamic collection of talented leaders from across the country,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “That’s no surprise. The Danville area is a community that is on the rise, and the college is poised to take a leadership role in that with both traditional offerings and innovative workforce certification training programs. This an exciting time for the institution as well as the families and businesses it serves.”

Dr. Thomas G. Coley has worked in higher education for more than 39 years. He began his career as an assistant professor at the University of Maryland at College Park in 1980. Six years later he began working at California State University, Fullerton, serving as the college’s government and community liaison. Coley proceeded to hold senior executive positions with the Oregon State System of Higher Education; Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio; and Black Hawk College in Moline, IL before becoming the president of Scott Community College in Scott County, Iowa in 2005. He joined Indiana’s Ivy Tech Community College System in 2011 as the chancellor of the Northwest and North Central Region. Following a system restructuring, he became the chancellor of South Bend – Elkhart campus, where he works today. Coley earned a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin, Madison as well as a master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Minnesota State University, Moorhead.

Dr. Jacqueline M. Gill has worked in higher education for more than 20 years. She began her career as the director of continuing education for the NE Campus of Tarrant County College in Hurst, Texas. In 2010, she became the college’s vice president of Academic Affairs & Community & Industry Education. Gill moved to Kansas City, MO in 2016 where she became the president of Metropolitan Community College. Prior to working in higher education, she worked for seven years as a social worker in the greater Dallas Fort Worth metropolitan area, including two years of recruiting candidates from underserved populations into healthcare career fields for the Dallas Fort Worth Area Health Education Center in Irving, Texas . Gill earned a doctorate, master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University, and a separate master’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Dr. Daniel Mosser has worked in higher education and workforce development training for more than 34 years. He began his career as a program manager/instructor and graduate teaching assistant at the University of Maryland at College Park. In 1992, he became the director of Curriculum and Instruction and curriculum specialist for the Home Builders Institute and National Association of Home Builders. Mosser became the vice president for Education and Workforce Development for Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc. in 1996 before joining Prince George’s Community College in 2001 as vice president for Workforce Development and Continuing Education. He currently holds that same position at the College of Southern Maryland in La Plata, MD, which he began in 2010. Mosser earned a doctorate and master’s degree from the University of Maryland at College park, and a bachelor’s degree from California University of Pennsylvania.

The three finalists seek to succeed Dr. Bruce Scism, the college’s fifth president, who retired at the end of 2018 after serving in that role for five years. Dr. Betty Jo Foster has served as the college’s interim president since January. The finalists will each visit the college in late early April to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Founded in 1966, Danville Community College serves the City of Danville, Pittsylvania County, and Halifax County. For more information about the college’s more than 100 programs of study, visit www.danville.edu.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Three Finalists for Danville Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-three-finalists-for-danville-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-03-20 17:42:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-03-20 21:42:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=28928 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28930 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-03-20 15:38:17 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-03-20 19:38:17 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Southside Virginia Community College. The finalists were among 81 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists, in alphabetical order, are (left to right below): Dr. Thomas G. Coley of Granger, IA; Dr. Jacqueline M. Gill of Lee’s Summit, MO; and Dr. Quentin R. Johnson of Mooresville, NC.

“I am impressed with breadth and width of talent the presidency of Southside Virginia Community College is attracting,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “The college’s service region is easily the geographically largest throughout the VCCS. While that poses some unique challenges it also offers some unique opportunities for a dynamic leader to step forward and help us demonstrate what a modern rural community college can be for those who depend on it.”

Dr. Thomas G. Coley has worked in higher education for more than 39 years. He began his career as an assistant professor at the University of Maryland at College Park in 1980. Six years later he began working at California State University, Fullerton, serving as the college’s government and community liaison. Coley proceeded to hold senior executive positions with the Oregon State System of Higher Education; Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio; and Black Hawk College in Moline, IL before becoming the president of Scott Community College in Scott County, Iowa in 2005. He joined Indiana’s Ivy Tech Community College System in 2011 as the chancellor of the Northwest and North Central Region. Following a system restructuring, he became the chancellor of South Bend – Elkhart campus, where he works today. Coley earned a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin, Madison as well as a master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Minnesota State University, Moorhead.

Dr. Jacqueline M. Gill has worked in higher education for more than 20 years. She began her career as the director of continuing education for the NE Campus of Tarrant County College in Hurst, Texas. In 2010, she became the college’s vice president of Academic Affairs & Community & Industry Education. Gill moved to Kansas City, MO in 2016 where she became the president of Metropolitan Community College. Prior to working in higher education, she worked for seven years as a social worker in the greater Dallas Fort Worth metropolitan area, including two years of recruiting candidates from underserved populations into healthcare career fields for the Dallas Fort Worth Area Health Education Center in Irving, Texas . Gill earned a doctorate, master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University, and a separate master’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Dr. Quentin R. Johnson has worked in higher education senior leadership roles for more than 20 years. That includes, beginning in 2004, serving as the president’s chief of staff and acting vice president for Student Life and Enrollment Management at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. In 2011 he became the senior vice president for Enrollment and Student Services at Fairmont State University and Pierpont Community and Technical College in West Virginia. Johnson moved to Guilford Technical Community College in North Carolina in 2012 to become the vice president of Student Support Services, the position he holds today. He also has some Virginia experience, previously serving as the assistant dean for Enrollment Management & Student Services at the UVa School of Nursing. Johnson earned a doctorate from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore; a master’s degree from Bowling Green State University; and a bachelor’s degree from Defiance College in Defiance, Ohio.

The three finalists seek to succeed Dr. Al Roberts, the college’s fifth president, who announced last fall that he was retiring at the end of June, having served as president for five years. The finalists will each visit the college in late March to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

SVCC serves one small city and spans ten rural counties across southern Virginia. The college offers 23 degrees at the associate level, a host of shorter-term academic and workforce development programs, opportunities for dually enrolled high school students, adult basic education, and other transitional services for non-traditional students.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Three Finalists for Southside Virginia Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-three-finalists-for-southside-virginia-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-03-20 19:15:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-03-20 23:15:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=28930 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29003 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-04-10 12:00:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-10 16:00:01 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND, VA – A $100,000 grant from the Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Foundation will allow more than a dozen rural Virginia community colleges to expand food emergency offerings to students, including the creation of three new programs, to address the growing issue of food insecurity on campus. The announcement of the grant and expanded student support was made in Roanoke during an annual faculty conference for Virginia’s Community Colleges.

This significant grant is part of Anthem’s continuing commitment to addressing Social Determinants of Health, such as food insecurity, as part of its commitment to improving the lives of the people in the communities it serves. According to a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report released in January 2019, estimates of food insecurity among college students ranged from 9 percent to more than 50 percent, but food insecurity hits students hardest on community college campuses. Virginia’s Community Colleges are working with community partners, such as Anthem, to eliminate barriers to academic attainment and more importantly, better long-term health outcomes.

“Anthem’s mission is to improve lives and communities and to make healthcare simpler. To help us accomplish this we work with local organizations to develop community-specific approaches that remove barriers and improve health,” said Jennie Reynolds, president, Anthem’s Virginia Medicaid Plan. “Food insecurity is associated with some of the most serious and costly chronic health problems, and it’s important we continue to identify ways to address this serious issue in our communities where help is needed and can be readily accessed. That is why we are excited about this unique partnership with Virginia’s Community Colleges, which allows us to not only address this critical issue, but also helps to bring greater awareness to the problem of hunger on campus.”

The Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Foundation’s $100,000 grant will help expand 11 existing food pantries on rural community college campuses, and allow three campuses to open pantries benefitting more students and their families. Currently, 32,563 enrolled students and their families have access to food emergency programs at the 11 rural colleges. Based on current enrollment data, this support will allow another 8,658 families to access food emergency programs.

“Student success is not just a matter of what occurs inside a classroom,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “Being hungry, uncertainty over where you are sleeping tonight – these are real world challenges for many of our students, who need our help. This grant is an important step as we continue to seek partners and resources to help students address the social challenges that threaten college dreams.”

Community colleges that will benefit from the grant include:
Blue Ridge Community College, Weyers Cave
Dabney S. Lancaster Community College, Clifton Forge
Danville Community College
Eastern Shore Community College, Melfa
Lord Fairfax Community College, Winchester
Mountain Empire Community College, Big Stone Gap
New River Community College, Dublin
Patrick Henry Community College, Martinsville
Paul D. Camp Community College, Franklin
Rappahannock Community College, Warsaw
Southside Community College, Alberta
Southwest Virginia Community College, Richlands
Virginia Highlands Community College, Abingdon
Wytheville Community College

About Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Foundation

Through charitable grant making, the Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Foundation LLC, an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, promotes Anthem’s inherent commitment to enhance the health and well-being of individuals and families in communities that Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield serves. The Foundation focuses its funding on strategic initiatives that make up its Healthy Generations Program, a multi-generational initiative that targets: maternal health, diabetes prevention, cancer prevention, heart health and healthy, active lifestyles, behavioral health efforts and programs that benefit people with disabilities. The Foundation also coordinates the company’s year-round Dollars for Dollars program which provides a 100 percent match of associates’ donations, as well as its Volunteer Time Off and Dollars for Doers community service programs. ®ANTHEM is a registered trademark of Anthem Insurance Companies, Inc. The Blue Cross and Blue Shield names and symbols are registered marks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE)

The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE) is the supporting arm of Virginia’s 23 community colleges. The VFCCE works to broaden educational access, support student success, and provide innovative solutions to workforce needs. Our mission is “providing access to education to all Virginians,” with a focus on expanding access and programs for underserved populations. To ensure access to high quality, affordable education, the VFCCE provides statewide leadership in raising funds for community college education, supplementing and supporting the activities of the 23 individual colleges, and securing support for major system-wide initiatives that could not be undertaken by any single college. For more information, please visit www.vfcce.org.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges

Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

*Featured image (L to R): VCCS Chancellor Glenn DuBois, VFCCE Corporate and Foundations Manager Susan Nolan, Anthem's Director of Marketing and Member Engagement Thomas Raper and President of Anthem’s Virginia Medicaid Plan Jennie Reynolds.    

###

[post_title] => Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Foundation and Virginia’s Community Colleges Partner to Fight Student Hunger [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => anthem-blue-cross-and-blue-shield-foundation-and-virginias-community-colleges-partner-to-fight-student-hunger [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-10 15:46:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-10 19:46:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29003 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29012 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-04-15 12:02:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-15 16:02:12 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – Dr. Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that Dr. Jacqueline M. Gill, currently of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, has been hired as the next permanent president of Danville Community College. She will assume the role at the beginning of July. Gill’s selection caps off a national search that attracted 80 applicants.

“Along with her energy and passion for the community college mission, Jacqueline Gill brings with her a tremendous background in workforce development,” said DuBois. “Further, I’m impressed with her experience working in multiple states. The Danville region is experiencing a renaissance and I’m excited to see what role the college can play in that with her as its president.” 

[caption id="attachment_29015" align="alignright" width="214"] Gill[/caption]

Gill has worked in higher education for more than 20 years. She began her career as the director of continuing education for the NE Campus of Tarrant County College in Hurst, Texas. In 2010, she became the college’s vice president of Academic Affairs & Community & Industry Education.                

Gill moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 2016 where she became the president of Metropolitan Community College. Prior to working in higher education, she worked for seven years as a social worker in the greater Dallas Fort Worth metropolitan area, including two years of recruiting candidates from underserved populations into healthcare career fields for the Dallas Fort Worth Area Health Education Center in Irving, Texas.                

Gill earned a doctorate, master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University, and a separate master’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington.                

“We are delighted to welcome Dr. Gill as the new President of Danville Community College. Having once been a community college student herself, Dr. Gill understands the value it holds for its students and the community it serves,” said Chris Eastwood, chair of the Danville Community College local board. “She has an extensive background in workforce development and is committed to student success whether building skills for a technical trade or for further academic study. We look forward to the passion and energy Dr. Gill will bring to the collaborative effort to continue the economic transformation of the Dan River Region.”               

Gill succeeds Dr. Bruce Scism, the college’s fifth president, who retired at the end of 2018 after serving in that role for five years. Dr. Betty Jo Foster has served as the college’s interim president since January.               

Founded in 1966, Danville Community College serves the City of Danville, Pittsylvania County, and Halifax County. For more information about the college’s more than 100 programs of study, visit https://danville.edu.              

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Dr. Jacqueline M. Gill Hired as President of Danville Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-jacqueline-m-gill-hired-as-president-of-danville-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-15 12:02:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-15 16:02:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29012 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 29013 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2019-04-15 12:02:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2019-04-15 16:02:41 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – Dr. Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that Dr. Quentin R. Johnson, currently of Mooresville, North Carolina, will become the next president of Southside Virginia Community College. He will assume the role at the beginning of July. Johnson’s selection marks the end of national search that attracted 81 applicants.

“Quentin Johnson brings to the table a strong student services background, and a deep understanding of the needs of nontraditional students – a group that we need to focus on,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “And he believes deeply in what we do. In fact, his son is currently attending one of our community colleges.”

[caption id="attachment_29014" align="alignright" width="214"] Johnson[/caption]

Johnson has worked in higher education senior leadership roles for more than 20 years. That includes, beginning in 2004, serving as the president’s chief of staff and acting vice president for Student Life and Enrollment Management at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. In 2011, he became senior vice president for Enrollment and Student Services at Fairmont State University and Pierpont Community and Technical College in West Virginia.

Johnson moved to Guilford Technical Community College in North Carolina in 2012 to become the vice president of Student Support Services, the position he holds today. He also has some Virginia experience, previously serving as the assistant dean for Enrollment Management & Student Services at the UVa School of Nursing.

Johnson earned a doctorate from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore; a master’s degree from Bowling Green State University; and a bachelor’s degree from Defiance College in Defiance, Ohio.

"After a thorough and fruitful search process, our board is delighted that Dr. Quentin Johnson will be the next president of Southside Virginia Community College. He brings an energy and insight that will prove to be invaluable in taking SVCC to the next level of service in our communities," said Betsy Sharrett, chair of the Southside Virginia Community College local board.

Johnson will succeed Dr. Al Roberts, the college’s fifth president, who announced last fall that he was retiring at the end of June, having served as president for five years.

SVCC serves one small city and spans ten rural counties across southern Virginia. The college offers 23 degrees at the associate level, a host of shorter-term academic and workforce development programs, opportunities for dually enrolled high school students, adult basic education, and other transitional services for non-traditional students.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Dr. Quentin R. Johnson Hired as the Next President of Southside Virginia Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-quentin-r-johnson-hired-as-the-next-president-of-southside-virginia-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2019-04-15 12:11:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-04-15 16:11:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=29013 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )