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VCCS Fall Listening Tour Begins
Statewide Strategic Planning Process
 

~ This plan will carry the VCCS into the next decade ~

RICHMOND — Virginia’s Community Colleges want to hear from you as they begin building their next statewide strategic plan. Glenn DuBois, chancellor of the VCCS, will conduct a series of listening tour sessions beginning later this month. Business, community, K-12 education and elected leaders are invited to participate in these sessions. Community college students will participate in separate, parallel sessions.

“Two out of every three jobs available in Virginia will require more than a high school education before the year 2020,” said DuBois. “It’s important for us to hear about what that means in these communities and how our colleges can help prepare people for that reality.”

This process will create the third strategic plan of DuBois’ tenure as chancellor. The next plan will begin in 2016 and carry through the beginning of the next decade. Like the two earlier plans, the next strategic plan will focus on meeting the external needs of the people, employers and communities Virginia’s Community Colleges serve through measurable goals.

A taskforce, charged with drafting plan, will begin working in 2014. John Downey, president of Blue Ridge Community College, will chair the panel. Edna Baehre-Kolovani, president of Tidewater Community College, will serve as co-chair. Virginia community college leaders from across the state, who will be named later this year, will make up the rest of the panel.  

Scheduled listening tour sessions include:

Friday, September 20          10:30 a.m.       Tidewater Community College
                                                                                    Virginia Beach Campus

Tuesday, November 12         10:30 a.m.       Northern Virginia Community College
                                                                                    Annandale Campus

Thursday, November 14       10:00 a.m.       Virginia Western Community College

Thursday, November 14       2:30 p.m.         Danville Community College

Wednesday, December 4      10:30 a.m.       Virginia Highlands Community College

Wednesday, December 4      2:30 p.m.         Blue Ridge Community College

Thursday, December 5          10:00 a.m.       J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College
                                                                             Parham Road Campus

Under the current plan, Achieve 2015, Virginia’s Community Colleges have more than doubled the number of minority and first generation students served; increased both graduation and transfer rates; weathered an unprecedented combination of historic budget cuts and enrollment increases; and more than doubled the number of Virginia employers served with tools like customized training.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students a year.  For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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Governor McDonnell has appointed three new members to the State Board for Community Colleges for 2013 – 2014.

James Cuthbertson

A native of Scotland, Cuthbertson has over 35 years of experience in the medical field. He is a graduate of Kent State University and holds a master’s degree in business administration from Case Western Reserve University. 

Cuthbertson is also a decorated Vietnam War veteran. In addition to three Purple Hearts and two Bronze Star medals, he was awarded the Silver Star- the nation’s third highest award for bravery.

Cuthbertson concluded his two-year term as chairman of the college board of J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College in June.

Darren Conner PE

A professional engineer by trade, Conner currently serves as President of Dewberry Engineers, Inc.’s southeast region. He directs a multi-disciplined staff of 175 professionals in Virginia, North Carolina and Georgia. In 2000, Conner received the Harold Williams Award – Dewberry’s highest honor.

Conner earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Virginia Tech and his associate’s degree in pre-engineering from Danville Community College.

Throughout his career, Conner has directed numerous operations that have contributed to the economic vitality of southside Virginia.

Benita Thompson-Byas

Thompson-Byas joined Thompson Hospitality in 1992 where she worked in the Operations Department before advancing to the position of VP of Marketing for the company’s contract and food service accounts.

In her current role, Thompson-Byas oversees all aspects of Thompson Hospitality’s strategic partnership with Compass Group, including operational responsibility for more than 600 dining centers in 46 states.

Thompson-Byas earned her bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Virginia.

Appointed by the Governor for up to two four-year terms, the board’s 15 members meet six times a year to set policy for all of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

 

 

[post_title] => The State Board for Community Colleges Welcomes New Members – 8.30.13 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-state-board-for-community-colleges-welcomes-new-members [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-09-09 14:38:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-09-09 14:38:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=10748 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7062 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2013-08-01 13:09:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-08-01 13:09:15 [post_content] => Virginia’s Community Colleges are welcoming three new presidents in August, to replace retiring presidents at John Tyler, Danville and Dabney S. Lancaster community colleges. Dr. Edward E. “Ted” Raspiller became the 7th president of John Tyler Community College effective Aug. 5. Raspiller was previously president of the Brazos County Campuses at Blinn College in Bryan, Texas and also directed the Community College Leadership doctoral program at Old Dominion University. Dr. Bruce R. Scism, joined Danville Community College as president effective Aug. 1. Scism is currently vice president of academic affairs at Volunteer State Community College in Gallatin, Tennessee. Dr. John J. Rainone arrived at Dabney S. Lancaster Community College to take the reigns as president in July. Dr. John J. Rainone to become President of Dabney S. Lancaster Community College Rainone, of Cape Neddick, Maine, was dean of institutional advancement at York County Community College. [post_title] => Three new presidents begin work at community colleges [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => three-new-presidents-begin-work-at-community-colleges-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-08-09 17:05:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-08-09 17:05:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=7062 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6797 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2013-07-26 10:18:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-26 10:18:37 [post_content] => [post_title] => Blog dummy article [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => blog-dummy-article [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-07-26 10:18:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-07-26 10:18:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=6797 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 375 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2013-07-24 09:29:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-24 09:29:58 [post_content] =>
~VCCS program credit audit will save students and taxpayers $10 million over three years. ~Audit removes nearly 1,100 credits from VCCS programs. ~A strategy of the VCCS Reengineering Taskforce, the audit took just over a year to complete.

VCCS Credit Audit Saves Millions of Dollars for Students and Taxpayers ~ Internal audit removes nearly 1,100 credits from credential programs ~

RICHMOND — Students and taxpayers will save more than $10 million dollars over the next three years following an exhaustive credit audit of the programs offered across Virginia’s 23 community colleges. The audit is a strategy of the VCCS Reengineering Taskforce to fight so-called “credit creep,” well intended though nonessential credits that are added to programs over time. The VCCS internal initiative removed 1,069 credits from programs that lead to a transfer degree, an applied degree, a certificate or a diploma. “This is a promise made and kept to the people we serve,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “While individuals always have the option to take additional classes to round out their learning or fulfill a personal interest, they should be confident that when a class is described as essential to earning a postsecondary credential, it is truly essential.” The audit worked by establishing recommended credit totals for each type of credential offered through Virginia’s Community Colleges and then examining how individual programs compare to that standard. Altogether, three out of every four programs (77 percent) offered through Virginia’s Community Colleges align with the recommended credit thresholds articulated in the audit. “Virginia’s Community Colleges maintain a delicate balance between offering high-quality programs and ensuring that Virginia students and families can access those offerings,” said Peter Blake, director of the State Council of Higher Education in Virginia (SCHEV). “I applaud them for continuing that work with this internal credit audit. This work represents true cost savings for students and taxpayers at a time of deep concern over the issues of tuition costs and student debt.” The credit audit took just over a year to complete. The estimated savings resulting from the credit audit were calculated from the estimated annual tuition, mandatory fee and state General Fund savings, based on the expected number of graduates over an average three-year period. About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students a year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND —Iraq war veteran and former Specialist Jameson Hughes faced a conundrum last year.

A class he needed to take as an ROTC cadet was offered only once in the spring semester, at the same time as his university ROTC class. So, the Chesterfield County resident signed up for an online version of the class being offered by John Tyler Community College.

“I was wary at first,” said Hughes. “But it was a good situation. The teacher was always available for questions and always offered great feedback. Accessing the class website was simple. The testing proctors on campus were very professional. It couldn’t have gone any smoother. The academic credit has already transferred. I can’t ask for more than that. ”

Hughes was not alone in his experience, as either a student with military status or one enrolled in an online class. Virginia’s Community Colleges set enrollment records last year in both categories. The VCCS served 41,470 students with a military status during the 2012-2013 academic year. At the same time, more than 44,838 people took advantage of the colleges’ online classes exclusively.

“Our colleges are proud of both of those numbers and rightfully so,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “We strive to help our returning veterans translate their military experience into skills that will serve them in the private sector, and offer them the chance to obtain additional skills. And as more of our life’s business occurs on a screen our colleges are working hard to keep their offerings relevant and flexible to the people we serve.”

The number of students with military status includes active duty service members, reservists, retirees, veterans, dependents and spouses. The 41,470 statewide figure represents an increase of 0.6 percent from the previous year. Patrick Henry Community College, in Martinsville, recorded the largest percentage increase at 17.6 percent. Northern Virginia Community College (333) and J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, in Richmond, (112) had the largest numerical increases.

The high number of military status students Virginia’s Community Colleges are serving does not surprise Hughes.

“Most of the people who deployed with me to Iraq have taken or are taking community college classes. Most of them enlisted for the G.I. Bill benefits. Four-year universities can be daunting to them. Community colleges offer them the chance to get their footing as students. I would have no trepidation at all at taking another community college class.”

The number of students enrolled exclusively in online classes increased by 1,018 –2.3 percent – to 44,838. Piedmont Virginia Community College, in Charlottesville, had the largest percentage increase at 23.2 percent. Northern Virginia and J. Sargeant Reynolds community colleges had the biggest numerical increases.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students a year.  For more information, please visit myfuture.vccs.edu.

[post_title] => Virginia’s Community Colleges Set New Record, Serving 41,000 Veterans [post_excerpt] => RICHMOND —Iraq war veteran and former Specialist Jameson Hughes faced a conundrum last year. A class he needed to take as an ROTC cadet was offered only once in the spring semester, at the same time as his university ROTC class. So, the Chesterfield County resident signed up for an online version of the class being offered by John Tyler Community College. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => virginias-community-colleges-set-new-record-serving-41000-veterans [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-09-09 15:29:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-09-09 15:29:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://vccs.dev/?post_type=newsroom&p=245 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11015 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2013-07-15 18:39:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-15 18:39:12 [post_content] =>

Richmond, Va. (July 15, 2013) – Virginia’s Community Colleges abound with life-changing moments for thousands of students across the Commonwealth. For David Jezierski, Meagan Gay and eight other outstanding community college students, opportunity came knocking when they were selected for the 2012-2013 class of the prestigious Valley Proteins Fellows scholarship program.

Out of the more than 400,000 people served by Virginia’s Community Colleges, only ten are selected each year as Valley Proteins Fellows. The program, which began with the 2011-2012 class, is now in its third year and is made possible through a generous donation by Valley Proteins, Inc., based in Winchester, Va. The approximate value of the scholarship, accompanied with professional development, travel and cultural opportunities, as well as a stipend for an internship and a community service project, totals up to $10,000 per Fellow.

Both Jezierski and Gay credited the professors and helpful administrators at Lord Fairfax Community College and Rappahannock Community College, respectively, for making them aware of the Valley Proteins Fellows scholarship and encouraging them to apply.

“Being selected as a Valley Proteins Fellow in June 2012 was an unbelievable honor,” said Jezerski. “The financial support allowed me to say ‘Yes’ to opportunities in my second year of college that would advance my career goals. Plus, there were professional development seminars to develop our leadership skills and even a trip to Richmond to meet Governor McDonnell, Senator Warner and other VIPs.”

Gay, who commented that she was very humbled and honored when she was notified about being selected as a Fellow, agreed that the scholarship’s financial aid was especially helpful to her family, which was faced with some sizeable medical expenses for a sick grandparent. “The Valley Proteins scholarship relieved my parents and me from having to stress about the financial aspect of paying for college.”
A major component of being a Valley Proteins Fellow is dedicating many hours to a community service project. Jezierski interned in his college’s math department, learning how to teach math at the community college level, his career aspiration. Gay, an avid horse lover, volunteered at B&R Ranch in Fredericksburg, which is an equestrian therapy program for students with special needs and disabilities.

“Thanks to the generous stipend of the Valley Proteins Fellows program, I was able to tutor students in math,” remarked Jezierski. Added Gay, “I learned how to interact and communicate with people who have physical, mental or behavioral challenges. This wouldn’t have been possible without the Valley Proteins scholarship.”

Jezierski and Gay know that the new class of Fellows is about to embark on a rewarding experience in the coming year. In their opinion, being named as Valley Proteins Fellows put them on the path to future success in the workforce. Jezierski plans to major in math at JMU and Gay will study chemistry at the College of William and Mary. Both of these 4-year colleges participate in a guaranteed transfer agreement with Virginia’s Community Colleges as long as certain GPA requirements are met.

“My brother and I are pleased to support the Valley Proteins Fellows program because it provides us with the opportunity to support communities where our business operates,” said Michael A. Smith, Vice President of Valley Proteins, Inc. Smith currently chairs the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, the supporting arm for the Virginia Community College System.

According to Smith, the state’s community colleges offer an excellent return on investment for any businesses that contribute funding to the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education. “Approximately 90 percent of students that attend a community college will stay in the community to work,” he added. “The community college system has a far-reaching effect on the state’s economic prosperity through the increase of a skilled labor pool for businesses as well as service providers such as nursing and automotive technicians, among many others.”

The 2013-2014 class of Fellows includes students from J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, Eastern Shore Community College, Lord Fairfax Community College, Piedmont Virginia Community College, Southwest Virginia Community College, Tidewater Community College, Thomas Nelson Community College and Wytheville Community College.

For information on the Valley Proteins Fellows and other scholarship opportunities offered through the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, visit www.myfuture.vccs.edu/Foundation.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students a year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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Tidewater Community College Alum Promises “Open Door” Leadership as New State Board Chair

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="320"]Meyer Bruce Meyer is the new chair of the State Board for Community Colleges[/caption] RICHMOND – “I am one of you.” That is the message Bruce Meyer wants everyone associated with Virginia’s Community Colleges to know heading into his first meeting of his one-year term as chair of the State Board for Community Colleges, and he has the credentials to prove it. “I am a proud alumnus of Tidewater Community College and I am humbled and honored to serve as your chair,” he said. Meyer is the second graduate of Virginia’s Community Colleges to serve as state board chair. Governor Bob McDonnell appointed Meyer to the board in July 2010 – Meyer’s second appointment to the panel. He served a previous four-year term beginning in 2001. Then, as chair of the Academic, Student Affairs and Workforce Development committees, he helped foster some of the first of what has since become more than 30 guaranteed transfer agreements between Virginia’s Community Colleges and public and private universities across the state and beyond. As chair, Meyer says he wants to continue expanding the opportunities community colleges are uniquely positioned to offer. “One of my top priorities as chair is workforce development so we can continue to help put our fellow Virginians back to work.” Meyer said. “I also will help to provide all the tools necessary to assist the chancellor and his expert team with the implementation of Achieve 2015, the VCCS six-year strategic plan." Reconstituting the Godwin Society is on Meyer’s front burner as well. “My plan is to turn this prestigious organization into an advocacy and foundation arm of the State Board for Community Colleges.” Meyer has a strong and active leadership commitment to his community. He is currently serving as vice chairman of advocacy for Prevent Child Abuse Hampton Roads and because of his long-standing political leadership, he has helped craft key legislation to benefit children and families throughout Virginia. Meyer also serves on the board of directors for the Tidewater Community College Alumni Association – an organization he helped launch back in 2011. As the founder and president of Virginia Beach-based Meyer Group Insurance, Meyer is recognized as a leader in the industry, and is often called upon at the state and federal level for his knowledge of insurance matters and the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Also taking on a new role on the board is Dorcas Helfant-Browning. She becomes the board’s vice chair, the title previously held by Meyer. Helfant-Browning, who also resides in Virginia Beach, currently serves as CEO, principal broker and managing partner of Coldwell Banker Professional Realtors. As the former president of the National Association of Realtors and the first woman to hold that position in the organization’s history, Helfant-Browning has been widely quoted in some of the nation’s leading newspapers and has made numerous television appearances including CNN’S Moneyline, ABC’s Good Morning America and CNBC. About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students each year in both academic and workforce training programs. For more information, please visit myfuture.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – The Great Expectations “Building the Bond” tour continues with two final public luncheons scheduled for Thursday, May 23, in Norfolk and Wednesday, May 29, in Richmond.

Anne Holton, the new program director of Great Expectations, and other Virginia Community College leaders have hosted events across Virginia this month, seeking ideas and support for elevating the next phase of the foster youth-focused program.

An initiative of the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education and Virginia’s Community Colleges, the Building the Bond tour is sponsored by Virginia529 College Savings Plan and spotlights National Foster Care Month.

The Building the Bond tour features a series of public luncheons for social workers, foster parents and others who work to help Virginia’s foster youth. The May 23 event is scheduled for the Norfolk Campus Student Center at Tidewater Community College. The May 29 event is scheduled for the J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College Conference Center at 1651 E. Parham Road.

Great Expectations began in fall 2008 at five pilot community colleges and has grown to serve foster youth at 17 Virginia community colleges today. More than 500 youth are currently in the program, which seeks to increase foster youth graduation and college retention rates. With its emphasis on a person-to-person connection with a Great Expectations coach, the program offers a unique answer to the vexing challenge of single-digit foster youth graduation statistics.

“As a society we can spend up to one million dollars on a youth who has spent his or her life inside the child welfare system. It is a heartbreaking loss to see so many of them end up incarcerated or homeless only months after turning 18,” said Holton, hired in January to lead Great Expectations. “Isn’t it so much better to have a program like ours help these young people earn a college credential that will allow them to sustain themselves? We’ve had a terrific first five years and we’re seeking ways to make the next five years even better.”

The first public Building the Bond tour event was sponsored in Charlottesville earlier this month. Holton also attended the Richard Leigh Songwriters Festival May 18 at Virginia Highlands Community College (VHCC) in Abingdon to benefit that college’s Great Expectations program. Leigh, a Grammy-winning artist, is an alum of VHCC.

“Anne Holton is bringing a lot of energy and excitement to an initiative that is close to my heart and I applaud her for it,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “Our colleges are at their best when they can bring the community together to address a community need. And the plight of Virginia’s foster youth is just that: an unmet community need. No question, this tour and the conversations and awareness it creates will only improve Great Expectations moving forward.”

The Great Expectations Building the Bond Tour is made possible by the generous support of Virginia529 College Savings Plan.

“Virginia529 is proud to sponsor the Great Expectations Building the Bond tour,” said Mary Morris, CEO of Virginia529 College Savings Plan. “Our mission is to help make college more affordable and accessible to all Virginians. The opportunity to partner with VCCS and the VFCCE to support the Great Expectations program is an exciting way to assist and encourage foster youth to realize their dreams, highlight the exceptional programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges and focus everyone on the importance of higher education.”

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Created more than 40 years ago, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit myfuture.vccs.edu.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education: Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students. Donors to the fund are invited to endow a single scholarship in their name and designate it to any of Virginia’s community colleges or regions. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/Foundation.

About Virginia529: Virginia529 is a college savings plan that offers flexible, affordable, tax-advantaged savings programs for qualified higher education expenses through its four programs – Virginia529 prePAIDSM (prePAIDSM), Virginia529 inVESTSM (inVESTSM), CollegeAmerica® and CollegeWealth®. With over 2.2 million accounts and $39 billion in assets under management as of December 31, 2012, Virginia529 is the largest 529 plan in the country. For more information on Virginia529’s college savings options, visit Virginia529.com.

[post_title] => “Building the Bond Tour” Continues to Spotlight Foster Youth-Focused Community College Initiative - 5.10.13 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => building-the-bond-tour-continues-to-spotlight-foster-youth-focused-community-college-initiative-may-20-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-08-16 15:00:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-08-16 15:00:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=6915 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6916 [post_author] => 13 [post_date] => 2013-05-16 07:34:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-05-16 07:34:40 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND — The State Board for Community Colleges established the 2013-2014 in-state tuition and mandatory fees rate at $130 per credit hour at its regular May meeting. Beginning this fall in-state students will pay an additional $5.50 per credit hour, which means the cost of a typical three-hour class will increase by $16.50 and the cost of a full-time load of classes for the year will by $165.

The approved 4.4 percent increase will allow Virginia’s Community Colleges to expand science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and health science (STEM-H) programs. It will increase the percentage of courses taught by full-time faculty from 45 percent to 47.5 percent – a level not seen throughout the VCCS since 2005. The increase will also fund the colleges’ portion of employee salary increases and higher health insurance costs.

“This tuition decision balances our priorities of access and quality. It permits Virginia’s Community Colleges to advance its long-held goal of hiring more full-time faculty members and offering more science and technology programs, which are expensive to offer, while adhering to our public promise of affordability,” said Hank W. Chao, chair of the State Board for Community Colleges.

KEEPING A PUBLIC PROMISE
The board’s tuition decision is in accord with Achieve 2015, the VCCS six-year strategic plan that calls for keeping community college tuition and fee rates at one-half or less than that of the comparable rates at Virginia’s four-year universities.

Currently, tuition and mandatory fees at Virginia’s Community Colleges are just over one-third (37.6 percent) of the average of comparable tuition and fees charged by Virginia’s public four-year institutions.

TUITION DIFFERENTIALS
The State Board also agreed to increase the tuition differential rate for Northern Virginia Community College by $2.00 per credit hour. Even with the differential, NVCC’s tuition remains the lowest among comparable colleges in the Washington, D.C. metro area.

Further, the board approved an increase of $1.00 per credit hour to the tuition differential rate for J. Sargeant Reynolds, Tidewater, Thomas Nelson and Virginia Western community colleges. Tidewater Community College will offset that tuition differential with a $1.00 decrease in its student activity fee. The tuition differential will help the included colleges attract and retain instructors in more competitive urban and suburban labor markets.

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION
The State Board increased the tuition rate for out-of-state students by $5.50 per credit hour to a total of $324.60 per credit hour. Out-of-state students make up approximately five percent of the total enrollment of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

About Virginia’s Community CollegesCreated more than 40 years ago, the VCCS is comprised of 23 community colleges located on 40 campuses across the commonwealth. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 405,000 students a year. For more information, please visit myfuture.vccs.edu.

*Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Health Science
[post_title] => Hiring Additional Full-Time Instructors, Offering More STEM-H* Programs Drive State Board Tuition Policy for 2013-2014 - 5.16.13 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hiring-additional-full-time-instructors-offering-more-stem-h-programs-drive-state-board-tuition-policy-for-2013-2014-may-16-2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-08-16 15:01:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-08-16 15:01:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=6916 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )