College Locator
If you are in Virginia, you are just 30 miles from a community college.
Here are the community colleges closest to
Home > News Archive

News Archive

Home > News Archive

  
	  
Array
(
    [0] => WP_Post Object
        (
            [ID] => 27713
            [post_author] => 3
            [post_date] => 2017-11-30 10:31:51
            [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-30 15:31:51
            [post_content] => 

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified four finalists for the position of president at Lord Fairfax Community College. The finalists were among 102 applicants from across the nation.

The four finalists, in alphabetical order (left to right in photo above), are Dr. Kimberly P. Blosser of Stanley, VA; Dr. Annesa Cheek of Dayton, OH; Dr. Julie Leidig of Centreville, VA; and Dr. J. Michael Thomson of Highland Hills, OH.

“The Lord Fairfax Community College presidency is appealing to an impressive group of community college leaders from around the country,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “The focus our colleges place on student success, our innovative approaches to providing short-term workforce training, and our stability make us attractive to high-performing education leaders seeking their next career step.” 

Dr. Kimberly P. Blosser has worked in education for more than 21 years – all but three of those in community college education. Blosser began her community college career at Blue Ridge Community College in Weyers Cave, VA as an associate professor in 1998. She advanced through several roles at BRCC, culminating in the title dean and chief information officer. In 2012, Blosser moved to Lord Fairfax Community College, where she currently works as the institution’s vice president of academic and student affairs. Blosser earned a doctorate and master’s degree from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, FL; and a master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Eastern Mennonite University in Harrisonburg, VA.

Dr. Annesa Cheek has worked in higher education for 11 years, working at Sinclair Community College where she began as the assistant to the college’s president. She later worked as deputy manager of a successful campaign to pass a countywide funding measure before becoming the college’s senior director of advancement. After a doctoral internship at the University of Texas, Cheek returned to Sinclair as the president’s chief of staff. She became the college’s vice president for student financial services in 2012. Cheek became the college’s vice president for school and community partnerships two years later.  Cheek earned a doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin; a master’s degree from the University of Dayton; and a bachelor’s degree from Tennessee State University.

Dr. Julie Leidig has worked in education for 33 years, including 27 years in higher education. After teaching English in Japan for five years, Leidig began her higher education career at the University of Texas at Austin in 1990, holding several part-time positions while pursuing her master’s degree. She went on to become an adjunct faculty member there before becoming a program director at the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in 1996. Leidig held several positions there over eight years, culminating with her role as director of instructional programs. In 2004, she became the vice president of instruction at Lone Star College – Montgomery in Conroe, TX. Leidig moved to the Loudon Campus of Northern Virginia Community College in 2010, where she continues to serve as the campus provost. Leidig earned a doctorate, and two master’s degrees from the University of Texas at Austin; and a bachelor’s degree from Syracuse University.

Dr. J. Michael Thomson has nearly 40 years of higher education experience. He currently serves as college vice president and Eastern Campus president at Cuyahoga Community College in Ohio. Thomson began his career as an assistant professor at Ouachita Baptist University. He later worked at the University of Cincinnati as a liaison with local governments. He spent 20 years at Northern Kentucky University, in several roles, culminating in the positon of department chair. Thomson has worked at Cuyahoga Community College since 2005, rising to his current position in 2013. Thomson earned a doctorate and master’s degree from the University of Kentucky, and a bachelor’s degree from Pennsylvania State University.

The four finalists seek to succeed Dr. Cheryl Thompson-Stacy, the college’s fourth president, who will retire on February 1 after serving in that role for nine years. The finalists will each visit the college in December to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members. 

Founded in 1970, Lord Fairfax Community College is a multi-campus public institution of higher education. With four locations — Middletown, Warrenton, Luray-Page County and most recently, Vint Hill— the college serves eight localities in the Shenandoah Valley and northern Piedmont regions. The localities include the counties of Clarke, Fauquier, Frederick, Page, Rappahannock, Shenandoah and Warren and the city of Winchester. LFCC offers more than 75 associate degree and certificate programs in a wide variety of disciplines. LFCC also serves the business community by offering workforce preparation programs for employees and employers. LFCC serves more than 9,000 unduplicated credit students and more than 11,000 individuals in professional development and business and industry courses annually.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Four Finalists for Lord Fairfax Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-four-finalists-for-lord-fairfax-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-30 14:09:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-30 19:09:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27713 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27704 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-11-29 11:55:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-29 16:55:34 [post_content] =>

~ Search Begins for ESCC’s Next Permanent President ~

RICHMOND – Dr. Glenn DuBois, the chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that he is appointing an interim president to lead Eastern Shore Community College following the retirement of its current president early next year.

Dr. Billy Greer begins work on January 22, 2018. Dr. Linda Thomas-Glover, who has served as the college’s president since 2009, recently announced that she is retiring in January. DuBois further announced the search for the college’s next permanent president will begin immediately, and will take approximately six months to complete.

Greer retired as the president of Virginia Wesleyan College in 2015, a position he held for some 22 years. Prior to that, Greer served as the president of two different small colleges: Brevard College in North Carolina and Andrew College in Cuthbert, GA.

“Billy Greer has the experience and community familiarity to help us as the interim president of Eastern Shore Community College,” said DuBois. “His resume includes presidencies at three different higher education institutions. We have every reason to believe that Dr. Greer will maintain the standard of leadership to which the college has grown accustomed as we conduct a national search to find ESCC’s next permanent president.”

Greer was a visiting scholar at the Princeton Theological Seminary and served on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Schools and Colleges and on the Commission on Campus Concerns of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. He holds a doctorate from Georgia State University and a doctorate from Emory University; a master’s degree from Drew University; and a bachelor’s degree from Valdosta State University.

“This is a terrific opportunity, and I’m excited to have it,” said Greer. “My family and I have long loved the Eastern Shore. It’s a special place for us and I view this as a chance to give something back to the Shore. Dr. Thomas-Glover has been a tremendous leader for the college, and we’re going to miss her greatly. It’s a privilege to have the chance to follow behind her and keep the college moving in the right direction.”

Eastern Shore Community College is a member of the Virginia Community College System and serves the residents of Accomack and Northampton Counties as a two-year institution of higher education. Originally a branch of the University of Virginia, ESCC joined the Virginia Community College System in 1971. The college was accredited and granted membership in the Southern Association of College Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) in 1973 and moved to its current location in 1974.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => Chancellor Appoints Interim President for Eastern Shore Community College [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => chancellor-appoints-interim-president-for-eastern-shore-community-college [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-29 11:56:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-29 16:56:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27704 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27686 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-11-27 15:58:39 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-27 20:58:39 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – An ad hoc committee of The State Board for Community Colleges will meet on Thursday, November 30, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. in the Provost Conference Room in the Bisdorf Building on the Alexandria campus of Northern Virginia Community College at 5000 Dawes Ave, Alexandria, VA 22311. The phone number is 703-933-1421.

One member of the committee will be participating by phone from an office location at 3545 Chain Bridge Road, Suite 106, Fairfax, VA 22030. 

The purpose of the meeting is to certify the candidates for the Presidency of Lord Fairfax Community College.

For more information, contact Jeffrey Kraus, jkraus@vccs.edu, 804-592-6767.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 300,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board for Community Colleges Ad Hoc Committee Schedules Meeting [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-for-community-colleges-ad-hoc-committee-schedules-meeting [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-27 15:59:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-27 20:59:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27686 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27668 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-11-16 13:05:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-16 18:05:15 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified four finalists for the position of president at Southwest Virginia Community College. The finalists were among 83 applicants from across the nation.

                                            

The four finalists, in alphabetical order, are Dr. Jeff McCord of Church Hill, TN; Dr. Timothy R. Oxley of Bridgeport, WV; Dr. J. Michael Thomson of Highland Hills, OH; and Dr. Thomas F. Wright of Cleveland, TN.

“The Southwest Virginia Community College presidency is attracting an impressive collection of community college leaders from around the country,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “The focus our colleges place on student success, our innovative approaches to providing short-term workforce training, and our stability make us attractive to high-performing education leaders seeking their next career step.”

Dr. Jeff McCord has worked in higher education for more than five years, following nearly two decades of service in the chemical industry. McCord currently serves as vice president of economic and workforce development at Northeast State Community College in Blountville, TN, where he provides administrative leadership for the Kingsport Campus. Prior to that, he spent 16 years at Eastman Chemical Company where he began as an advanced systems analyst and worked his way up through several supervisory and management positions, including managing the company’s corporate university. McCord earned a doctorate from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; a master’s degree from Kennesaw State University; and a bachelor’s degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Dr. Timothy R. Oxley has more than 25 years of experience in higher education. He currently works at Fairmont State University in West Virginia, where he has held several positions since first joining the institution in 2002. Oxley currently serves as the university’s vice president for student services. Prior to working in higher education, Oxley spent nearly 16 years in several state economic development organizations. His careers came together in 1999 when he became the director of sponsored programs at Concord University in Athens, WV. Oxley earned a doctorate and master’s degree from Marshall University, and a bachelor’s degree from Concord University.

Dr. J. Michael Thomson has nearly 40 years of higher education experience. He currently serve as college vice president and Eastern Campus president at Cuyahoga Community College in Ohio. Thomson began his career as an assistant professor at Ouachita Baptist University. He later worked at the University of Cincinnati as a liaison with local governments. He spent 20 years at Northern Kentucky University, working several roles, culminating in the positon of department chair. Thomson has worked at Cuyahoga Community College, rising to his current position, since 2013. Thomson earned a doctorate and master’s degree from the University of Kentucky, and a bachelor’s degree from Pennsylvania State University.

Dr. Thomas F. Wright has more than 25 years of higher education experience. He currently serves as vice president for finance and advancement at Cleveland State Community College, as well as the executive director of the college’s education foundation. Wright previously served as the college’s interim vice president for academic affairs. Prior to that, Wright worked for a decade at Appalachian State University, rising to the position of director of housing operations. He began his higher education career at Middle Tennessee State University where he served in several roles including interim assistant dean of students. He earned a doctorate from Tennessee State University, and a master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Middle Tennessee State University.

The four finalists seek to succeed Dr. Mark Estepp, the college’s second president, who will retire at the end of this year after serving in that role since 2007. The finalists will each visit the campus of SWVCC in late November and early December to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

Southwest Virginia Community College, founded in 1968 and located outside Richlands, VA, is a comprehensive two-year college serving approximately 3,200 students annually from the counties of Buchanan, Dickenson (partial), Russell, and Tazewell.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => State Board Committee Certifies Four Finalists for Southwest Virginia Community College Presidency [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-committee-certifies-four-finalists-for-southwest-virginia-community-college-presidency [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-16 13:56:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-16 18:56:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27668 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27645 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-11-13 12:46:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-13 17:46:40 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges will convene its regular meeting on Thursday, November 16, at 9 a.m. in the offices of the Virginia Community College System at 300 Arboretum Place, Richmond, Virginia, 23236.

State Board Committees will meet on Wednesday, November 15.

Public comment will be received at each regular meeting of the board following the approval of minutes. Persons desiring to comment must notify the Chancellor’s Office in advance as specified by the VCCS Policy Manual.

A complete agenda for the State Board meeting is available at: http://www.boarddocs.com/va/vccs/Board.nsf/Public.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 300,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

[post_title] => State Board for Community Colleges November 2017 Business Meeting [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => state-board-for-community-colleges-november-2017-business-meeting [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-13 12:50:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-13 17:50:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27645 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27638 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-11-10 16:53:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-10 21:53:44 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND — Veterans and military students will have an easier time earning credit for prior learning thanks to a new online tool created by Virginia’s Community Colleges. The Credits2Careers Veterans Portal will allow students to upload their Joint Services Transcript to see instantly how many academic credits their work experience could translate into more than 1,700 community college programs. You can access the portal at this link: www.credits2careers.org.

 “Today’s announcement means our community colleges are the only college system in the nation with this comprehensive, patent-pending tool,” said Carlos Hopkins, Virginia’s Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs. “The Credits2Careers online tool will make it easier than ever before for our men and women in uniform to find a career path to transition from their service to civilian life. This portal will save individuals time, money, and hassle as they look for an accelerated way into the civilian workforce.”

Virginia’s Community Colleges served 36,868 veterans and military-related students last year. This tool positions the colleges to attract and help even more of these students.

“Awarding credit for prior learning is something that always sounded better in theory than it was in practice, until today,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “Military service is increasingly a technical experience. And thanks to the hard work of hundreds of people across our community colleges, and other state agencies, we are in a positon to reward that in-uniform service in an unprecedented way.”

Matt Adams, a Marine Corps reservist and Tidewater Community College student demonstrated the portal at the unveiling event at the Virginia Community College System Office.

“I can’t say enough about this new tool. It’s going to help a lot of people like me save time and money in the pursuit of a college credential,” Adams said. “This is a difference-maker for those seeking their next step in civilian life. I’m sharing it with everyone I served with.”

The Credit2Careers portal debut coincided with the dedication of Veterans Resource Centers at seven of Virginia’s Community Colleges. The colleges are part of the commonwealth’s VERITAS (Veteran Education Resource Initiative for Transition, Advising and Success) program. Those colleges include: Germanna in Fredericksburg; J. Sargeant Reynolds and John Tyler in the Richmond area; Northern Virginia; Tidewater; Thomas Nelson on the Virginia Peninsula; and Virginia Western in Roanoke.

“These centers are a central hub for all veteran activities on campus. They are a quiet place for students to study; and they enable veterans to connect with each other, helping them renew the bonds of military service,” said DuBois.

Editor's note: Images from today's event can be found at:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/vccs

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => New Online Tool Will Help More Service Members Earn More Credit for Prior Learning [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => new-online-tool-will-help-more-service-members-earn-more-credit-for-prior-learning [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-10 16:54:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-10 21:54:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27638 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27426 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-09-05 17:46:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-05 21:46:16 [post_content] =>

(Richmond)Glenn Dubois, the Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges made the following statement today in response to the Trump Administration’s DACA Announcement:

“I am deeply saddened to see today’s announcement regarding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) in Washington, and my thoughts quickly turn to the more than 1,000 community college students across Virginia whose future hangs in the balance as this policy debate plays out. Further, I join the chorus heard across America calling on Congress to quickly enact sensible and compassionate immigration policy.

“As I’ve said many times: Virginia’s Community Colleges exist to give everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. Our faculty, staff, and students should never question if that mission includes them because it always does.

“We await further results from Washington, and guidance from the Office of the Attorney General of Virginia on what our community colleges can do as we pursue our mission and support the individuals who seek opportunity with us.”

[post_title] => Statement of Glenn DuBois, Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => statement-of-glenn-dubois-chancellor-of-virginias-community-colleges-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-05 17:46:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-05 21:46:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27426 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27368 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-08-23 12:05:03 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-23 16:05:03 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education is proud to introduce its seventh class of Valley Proteins Fellows.

This year’s scholarship recipients are:
Tewodros “Teddy” Maxson, Central Virginia
Marie Shiraki, Dabney S. Lancaster
Lydia Hodges, Patrick Henry
Samantha Scott, Piedmont Virginia
Mostafa Mohibzadh, Thomas Nelson
Donald Cooper, J. Sargeant Reynolds
Hope Geiger, Southwest Virginia
Madison Goodie, Southwest Virginia
Austin Bryant, Virginia Western
Daniel Feher, Wytheville

Out of the more than 242,000 people Virginia’s Community Colleges serve across the commonwealth each year, only 10 second-year students are selected for the Valley Proteins Fellows Program. The scholarship, combined with professional development, travel, and cultural opportunities has an approximate value of $15,000.

In addition to receiving full tuition, book expenses and fees, the Fellows participate in a unique curriculum of intellectual and cultural activities. The Fellows also volunteer 80 hours of community service during the academic year to strengthen their leadership skills and develop a strong foundation for future success.

The fellows program is made possible thanks to the generous support of Valley Proteins, Inc. The Winchester-based company has been in the rendering business for 68 years and currently operates 15 plants in eight states.

“Valley Proteins is privileged to invest in the future of some of Virginia's most outstanding students,” said Gerald F. (J.J.) Smith, Jr., president of Valley Proteins, Inc. “Helping to remove some of the obstacles that can hinder their success is a priority for us, and it reflects our commitment and support for the community college mission overall.”

The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, the fundraising arm of Virginia’s Community Colleges, oversees the fellows program, which Valley Proteins has funded for seven consecutive years.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 242,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

About the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education: Working hand in hand with Virginia’s 23 community colleges, the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education seeks to guarantee financial assistance to all students who dream of attending college. The foundation is building an endowment that is already generating interest to provide full scholarships to selected community college students; helping more Virginia foster youth pursue and complete higher education through its Great Expectations program; and leading a partnership to improve rural Virginia’s education pipeline through the Rural Virginia Horseshoe Initiative. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu/giving.

###

[post_title] => Celebrated Valley Proteins Fellowships Awarded [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => celebrated-valley-proteins-fellowships-awarded [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-23 12:14:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-23 16:14:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27368 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27333 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-08-14 12:29:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-14 16:29:59 [post_content] =>

Glenn Dubois, the Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, made the following statement today in response to the fatal weekend of violence in Charlottesville:

(Richmond) – “It is with a heavy and sad heart I offer my condolences and prayers for those who lost their lives, and those injured, in the violence that erupted this past weekend in Charlottesville. Heather Heyer is a former student of Piedmont Virginia Community College. It is with strength and determination however, that I affirm that the racially motivated division, hatred, intimidation, and fear outsiders brought to the City of Charlottesville has no place on a Virginia community college campus, and are a violation of both the words and spirit of our community college mission.

“Virginia’s Community Colleges exists to give everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. Our faculty, staff, and students should never question if that mission includes them because it always does. Higher education has been, and continues to be, an antidote to ignorance, bigotry and hatred. This past weekend is a painful and powerful reminder of how much work remains for us to do.

“I am a passionate student of history. Throughout the extensive narratives that tell the Virginia story and the America story there is a clear and convincing pattern that regularly emerges: our progress and our success depend on our inclusivity. We move forward farther and faster when we move together. Community colleges were built to advance that purpose. I have dedicated my 36-year career to it, and remain steadfast to it.”

[post_title] => Statement of Glenn DuBois, Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => statement-of-glenn-dubois-chancellor-of-virginias-community-colleges [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-14 12:30:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-14 16:30:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27333 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27234 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2017-07-20 10:10:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-20 14:10:12 [post_content] =>

RICHMOND – Eleanor Saslaw begins her yearlong term as the chair of the Virginia State Board for Community College this month, and she is focusing on increasing community college enrollment.

Serving on the board for the last three years – including one year as the Board’s vice chair – represents only a fraction of the experience Saslaw brings to the post. After all, the two-time college graduate has spent her entire career working in education. Her experience ranges from being a teacher, counselor and director of student services in Fairfax County Public Schools, to serving as the president of the Virginia Counselors Association, to serving as a member of and the president of the Virginia Board of Education.

Saslaw says educating an individual may just be the most important thing you can do for them and the community they live in.

“If you don’t educate people, you end up supporting them,” she said. “We want to see Virginians succeeding in the 21st century; that includes new Virginians. More education means a higher standard of living. It means our businesses thrive, and it means our tax base is strong. Our community colleges do a terrific job of helping people get there.”

Saslaw is placing a priority for the coming year on helping Virginia’s Community College serve more people. The colleges are seeking ways to reverse several years of enrollment declines. Saslaw wants the Board to ensure the colleges have the tools and knowledge to turn that around.

“Chancellor DuBois and I have been talking about that and he shares my concerns,” Saslaw said. “We’ve had good luck in the past using the task force model to address big, statewide challenges. It may be time to do that here.”

Saslaw was born in San Francisco and moved to the East Coast when she was eleven. She and her husband, state Senator Dick Saslaw (D-Fairfax County) moved to Virginia after getting married. They have a daughter who works as a lawyer in San Francisco.

“I feel like I gave something back with that one,” Saslaw said.

Saslaw has won numerous awards including the Friend of School Psychologists Award (2011) and Counselor of the Year (1998 and 1994). She has a master’s degree in secondary counseling and a bachelor’s degree in social studies education.

Featured image: Newly-installed Board Chair Eleanor Saslaw is flanked by Chancellor Glenn DuBois.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

###

[post_title] => New State Board Chair Focused on Increasing Community College Enrollments [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => new-state-board-chair-focused-on-increasing-community-college-enrollments [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-07-20 11:59:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-07-20 15:59:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.vccs.edu/?post_type=newsroom&p=27234 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => newsroom [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) )
Page 1 of 1512345...10...Last »