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RICHMOND – Dr. Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that he is naming Dr. Betty Jo Foster as the interim president of Danville Community College (DCC), effective at the beginning of 2019.

[caption id="attachment_28610" align="alignleft" width="240"] Foster[/caption]

Foster is a familiar face throughout the Danville region having worked at DCC for 36 years before retiring as the college’s academic vice president in 2004. She has also served stints as the interim president of Central Virginia Community College, in Lynchburg, and as the interim president and CEO of the Danville Pittsylvania County Chamber of Commerce.

“Betty Jo has earned a reputation as an outstanding leader in both higher education and in the business community,” said DuBois. “She is strongly-positioned to keep the college focused on our students as we move forward and launch our national search for the college’s next permanent president.”

Foster began as a DCC professor in 1971. She ascended through the college’s ranks, becoming its vice president for academic and student services in 1993 – a position she held through her retirement in 2004. She served as the interim president of CVCC for six months in 1998. Beginning in August 2017, she served as the interim president and CEO of the Danville/Pittsylvania County Chamber of Commerce for five months. Foster holds a bachelor’s degree from Radford University; a master’s degree from Virginia Tech; and a doctorate from NOVA University.

“I consider this opportunity to be both an honor and a privilege. It’s like coming home,” said Foster. “So much of my professional life has occurred on the campus of DCC. I appreciate the chance to return there once again and work with the faculty, staff, and students that make it such a special place. I believe the college is in a strong position and will attract terrific candidates in the next presidential search.”

Foster replaces Dr. Bruce Scism who announced in September that he is retiring at the end of the calendar year after more than five years as DCC president.

A national search will begin in early 2019 to hire the next DCC president. That process typically takes six to nine months to complete.

About Danville Community College: Founded in 1966, Danville Community College is a two-year institution of higher education under the statewide Virginia Community College System. DCC's service area includes the City of Danville, Pittsylvania County, and Halifax County. For more information about the college’s more than 100 programs of study, visit www.danville.edu.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – Dr. Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that he is naming Dr. Charlie White the interim president of Virginia Highlands Community College (VHCC), effective immediately.

[caption id="attachment_28545" align="alignright" width="125"] White[/caption]

White is a veteran higher education leader who has spent much of his career working at Virginia’s Community Colleges, including eight years as the president of Wytheville Community College (WCC). He also served recently as the interim president of New River Community College (NRCC).

“Charlie is a seasoned community college president who knows how to bring people together and move an institution forward,” said DuBois. “He was born in Southwest Virginia, grew up there, and spent his career there so he understands the region. Charlie is the right person to keep Virginia Highlands focused on our students moving forward as we prepare to search for the college’s next permanent president.”

Dr. White has worked in various positions within Virginia’s Community College (VCCS) since 1971 when he joined the NRCC faculty. He chaired the Division of Arts and Sciences at NRCC from 1983-1998, and was a professor of Biology and chair of the Math and Science Division prior to that. White was also NRCC’s vice president for instruction and student services, as well as interim vice chancellor for academic services and research in the VCCS office during 2005 before serving as president of Wytheville Community College from 2006-2015.

White holds a doctorate from the University of Tennessee and bachelor’s and master’s degrees from East Tennessee State University. He also holds an associate degree from Hiwassee College in Tennessee.

White replaces Dr. Gene Couch who is retiring after four years as VHCC president.

A national search will begin in early 2019 to hire the next VHCC president. That process typically takes six to nine months to complete.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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Select Virginia Community Colleges will create Institutes of Excellence for major infrastructure industries

RICHMOND—Virginia’s Community Colleges today announced a $4 million economic investment over the next two years to support curriculum development and FastForward workforce training in the rapidly growing fields of utility-scale solar energy and heavy construction. Select community colleges will develop programs that can be expanded across the commonwealth as the demand grows for skilled workers in these fields.

VIRGINIA SOLAR WORKFORCE INITIATIVE

Southside Virginia Community College (SVCC) will receive funds to work with businesses in the energy industry to develop and deploy the Virginia Solar Workforce Initiative, a first-in-the-state curriculum and training program for the utility-scale solar industry. The need for utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) installers, who earn an average starting salary of $42,000-50,000, is emerging in Virginia, and the U.S. Department of Energy reports the solar energy sector is poised for robust growth.

“The Virginia Solar Workforce Initiative is an exceptional example of a public-private partnership,” said Dr. Al Roberts, president of Southside Virginia Community College. “These jobs represent an excellent opportunity for Virginians to be a part of this dynamic, high-growth industry, and we’re excited to partner with industry leaders in the utility-scale solar field, the Maryland-DC-Delaware-Virginia Solar Energy Industries Association, to create this program.”

VCCS HEAVY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS

The new grants also will increase access to FastForward training for workers in the heavy construction industry. Lord Fairfax Community College (LFCC), Piedmont Virginia Community College (PVCC), and Germanna Community College (GCC) will team up to develop a curriculum and statewide training capabilities for courses that support Virginia’s development sector.

In partnership with the Heavy Construction Contractors Association (HCCA) and the Virginia Asphalt Association (VAA), the colleges will establish online access to training programs in the principles and practices of road building and other major infrastructure projects.

“The expanded initiative provides an opportunity to truly create a pipeline of current and future employees who will reap the rewards of a well-paid and rewarding career pathway,” said Ken Garrison, Executive Director of the Heavy Construction Contractors Association. “We have worked collaboratively with LFCC to build the pilot program and our firms benefited from hiring the graduates.”

“We look forward to working in partnership with our sister colleges to scale and expand the program in order to serve more employers and give access to more job seekers to obtain these high demand industry credentials,” said Kimberly Blosser, president of LFCC.

The average starting salary in Virginia for heavy equipment operators is $43,000 a year.

Since July of 2016, Virginians who trained in FastForward programs at community colleges have earned more than 11,000 valuable industry recognized workforce credentials. FastForward training programs are specifically geared toward the needs of local businesses and offer students affordable access to new careers in weeks or months instead of semesters and years.

“FastForward is benefitting both the individuals who earn credentials in high demand fields and the businesses that are eager to hire skilled employees,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “These strategic investments will bolster those talent pipelines feeding these emerging industries and prepare even more people for these good-paying careers.”

Find out more about FastForward at www.fastforwardva.org.

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FREDERICKSBURG, Va. – In their first two years, FastForward workforce training programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges (VCCS) have enabled Virginians to earn more than 11,000 industry-recognized credentials to advance their careers. The most recent statistics were shared with the Virginia State Board for Community Colleges at its scheduled July meeting.

“Thanks to FastForward, thousands of our fellow-Virginians have been able to secure new jobs and career promotions,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “In the process, many of these newly-empowered workers are enjoying healthy wage hikes, and Virginia businesses are finding more of the skilled workers they need.”

“When we first proposed this initiative, we hoped to achieve 10,000 new credentials in the first two years, and we did even better than that,” DuBois added. “But the numbers tell only part of the story.”

This spring, the VCCS surveyed people who trained through FastForward. Nearly 700 FastForward graduates responded.

Here’s a sampling of their survey responses:

“I was stuck in a dead end job for a boss I didn't like. Training was very satisfying, fun, and informative. After training, I got a job right away in a field that I like. I'm getting experience toward getting the job I want, which would not be possible without the training.”

“I needed a job with benefits and I was tired of working weekends. Now I am working a job that is Monday-Friday, and I love it. I am being challenged and supported by my supervisors, and my coworkers are good to get along with.”

“I had worked at a basically dead-end job for years and had few marketable skills. Within the first two sessions of class, I felt like I was finally moving forward in life. It only took me about two weeks after training to find a job in the field I trained for.”

“I was very frustrated with the part time work I was doing, with low pay and no benefits. I had been out of the work force taking care of my elderly mother, but it was only for two and a half years. After she died, I could not get anyone to hire me for a full time job with benefits. People said things like ‘We don't hire anyone who hasn't worked in a while’ as if there was something wrong with me for taking care of my mother. I had to beg for food and medicine to survive, even with the part time job. I was so glad to be able to take a short-term training program at night that showed that I could learn new skills and was willing to work in a challenging field. I passed the National certification exam and began applying for jobs. I was chosen for the first one I was interviewed for! I love my new job, and have the pay and benefits I need. The instructor was wonderful.”

“Coming from retail work but with huge passion to join the health care field to save lives, I had no knowledge about health care. But after taking my CCMA program, I totally am on the right track of achieving my dream of being a part of the health care team to save lives.”

“We’re grateful for the General Assembly’s continued support for the Workforce Credential Grant program that makes FastForward programs so affordable to Virginians,” said DuBois. “We’re proud to share some of the stories that show FastForward is changing lives for the better in Virginia.”

Learn more at www.fastforwardva.org.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – The Virginia State Board for Community Colleges approved a process, at its regular July meeting, to examine the sustainability of VCCS institutions. The measure, which focuses on accessibility, effectiveness, and efficiency within the VCCS, is a response to a recommendation from a recent Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission (JLARC) study that identified the lack of any process in VCCS Policy Manual for considering college consolidations and closings.

“Everyone on this Board is here to support our colleges in their urgent mission to serve people,” said Robin Sullenberger, chair of the State Board for Community Colleges. “And it makes sense to have the tools necessary to examine our own efficiency and ensure that we are being responsible both to the students we serve and the taxpayers who support us.”

A task force consisting of three former members of the State Board and three retired presidents wrote the Policy to Maintain Accessibility, Effectiveness, and Efficiency with the VCCS. All six of those individuals live in rural Virginia, and the presidents had all worked at small colleges. They were selected to ensure the nuances and unique considerations of the communities most likely to be touched by this policy were priority considerations in its creations.

“The VCCS is home to some of the very biggest and some of the very smallest higher education institutions in Virginia,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “I commend the committee for their work. They found a fair balance between our mission of affordability and access and our fiscal responsibility.”

Under the new policy, each of Virginia’s 23 community colleges will be evaluated annually, based on factors including effective delivery of programs to students, and recognizing the role the college plays in its local community. Detailed assessments will be conducted for colleges that fall below certain thresholds, including number of students served, population of service area, and cost of programs relative to the rest of the community college system.

“Should a college undergo a detailed assessment, there are requirements to gather information and perspectives from community stakeholders, and that’s important,” said Sullenberger. “Everyone knows that a community college is more than just some numbers on a spreadsheet.”

The annual evaluations required by the new policy will begin before the end of the calendar year. Should the findings necessitate a detailed assessment; the results of it will go to the chancellor, who would make a recommendation for Board consideration.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND —Virginia’s Community Colleges (VCCS) and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) are working together to reduce barriers and make college transfer seamless for students who attend J. Sargeant Reynolds (JSRCC) or John Tyler (JTCC) community colleges and aspire to attend VCU. The collaboration between the VCCS and VCU to build new transfer models, for students majoring in arts and humanities, is being underwritten by grants awarded to the institutions by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The new transfer models, called the “Guided Pathways to Arts and Humanities” by VCCS and “Mapping Pathways to the Arts and Humanities” at VCU, will support four-year pathways in humanities and select arts disciplines between VCU and John Tyler Community College and J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, and will accelerate baccalaureate degree completion and strengthen faculty collaborations between the partner institutions. Those students will follow guided pathways focused on courses offered at the community colleges that will be aligned with major maps of the full undergraduate experience at VCU, including curricular, co-curricular and experiential and applied learning opportunities. Faculty members from all the participating institutions will collaborate to design the shared courses and curricula. Students will also receive comprehensive transfer advising along the way.

“This is an exciting opportunity to build a smarter, more student-focused transfer blueprint that could then be applied to other programs and other institutions,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “Ideally, this process will build a college transfer experience that is closer to the expectations of our students, will result in the loss of fewer college credits along the way, and will help students seeking a bachelor’s degree reduce their debt burden. We couldn’t ask for better partners in this work than VCU and the Mellon Foundation.”

The first year of the three-year, grant funded effort will focus on evaluation and planning. The first cohort of students to participate in it will occur in 2019, and one of the key outcomes by the end of the grant period is to develop and implement dual admission policies and processes for interested and eligible students. In addition, a select group of Mellon Fellows identified by the community colleges would participate in undergraduate research and learning experiences beyond those available to today’s transfer students in preparation for their successful transition to VCU.

“The generous grants from The Mellon Foundation help make VCU’s mission to provide students with a high-quality undergraduate experience possible,” said VCU President Michael Rao, Ph.D. “I look forward to collaborating with my colleagues at J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College and John Tyler Community College to develop a seamless transfer process that is easy to navigate and cost-efficient for students. Collectively, our goal is to ensure that students receive an education that will prepare them for their next step in life. I am confident we will succeed.”

The Mellon Foundation awarded $1.48 million to the VCCS, and $868,000 to VCU, to support the planning and execution of this new transfer model. The grants represent the first award the Mellon Foundation has made to either institution.

“As more than one-third of America’s 17.5 million undergraduates are enrolled in community colleges, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has sought to support innovative partnerships that provide new pathways for aspiring humanities students to obtain four-year degrees,” said Mariët Westermann, executive vice president for programs and research at the Mellon Foundation. “In addition to providing scholarly resources for community college faculty and students, collaborations of this sort also give university faculty and doctoral students insight into diversity and inclusion practices that are the hallmark of community college classrooms.”

The VCCS currently holds a guaranteed articulation agreement with VCU. Historically, approximately 75 students a year transfer from J. Sargeant Reynolds and John Tyler to VCU in the arts and humanities. This collaborative effort aims to increase the number of transfer students in the arts and humanities, but more importantly, to ensure that these students successfully compete with other degree-seeking students and prepare them for careers or graduate education.

All told, the VCCS holds formal, statewide transfer agreements with nearly three-dozen four-year universities, including VCU. In addition, Virginia’s 23 community colleges offer hundreds of local articulation agreements, and Virginia has a tuition grant in place to encourage transfer students to complete their associate degree before transitioning to a university.

The VCCS and VCU grants were awarded through The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s Community College-Research University Partnerships, a special initiative of its program in Higher Education and Scholarship in the Humanities. This initiative, which grew out of the Mellon Foundation’s 2014 strategic plan, aims to foster collaborations that can respond effectively to challenges across the system of higher education. The growing role of community colleges in that ecosystem, which has been promoted by a range of federal and state entities, is of great interest to the Mellon Foundation.

The Mellon Foundation’s initial grants in support of such collaborations in Cleveland, Seattle, San Diego, San Francisco, Baltimore, New York City, and now Virginia, focus on partnerships between universities and community colleges that have strong humanities leadership and that share a commitment to successful humanities transfer. Given the enormous size of the community college sector and the wide variety of articulation agreements between two- and four-year institutions across the US, the Foundation has sought to identify areas of intervention that can gain scale and be replicated around the country.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 252,000 students each year. For more, please visit www.vccs.edu.

About VCU and VCU Health: Virginia Commonwealth University is a major, urban public research university with national and international rankings in sponsored research. Located in downtown Richmond, VCU enrolls more than 31,000 students in 217 degree and certificate programs in the arts, sciences and humanities. Thirty-eight of the programs are unique in Virginia, many of them crossing the disciplines of VCU’s 11 schools and three colleges. The VCU Health brand represents the VCU health sciences academic programs, the VCU Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Health System, which comprises VCU Medical Center (the only academic medical center and Level I trauma center in the region), Community Memorial Hospital, Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, MCV Physicians and Virginia Premier Health Plan. For more, please visit www.vcu.edu and vcuhealth.org.

About The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation: The Mellon Foundation endeavors to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies. To this end, it supports exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work. The Foundation makes grants in five core program areas: Higher Education and Scholarship in the Humanities; Arts and Cultural Heritage; Diversity; Scholarly Communications; and International Higher Education and Strategic Projects. For more, please visit https://mellon.org.

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RICHMOND – Dr. Paula P. Pando, of Atlantic Highlands, NJ, will become the next permanent president of J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College. That announcement was made today by Dr. Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. Pando’s selection concludes a national search that attracted 102 applicants.

“Paula Pando’s life is a uniquely American success story,” said DuBois. “She was very young when her family came to the U.S. from Chile. She had to learn a new language and a new culture, and she has excelled ever since. She has built an impressive career, focused on helping people find and leverage opportunity, and I expect her to be a terrific president for Reynolds Community College.”

Pando has worked in higher education for more than 21 years. She began her career in 1994 as the director of campus activities and programs at Saint Peter’s University in Jersey City, NJ. Beginning in 2000, Pando worked as a consultant for a New York firm, facilitating sensitivity and diversity training, among other topics.

In 2003, she joined Hudson County Community College, in Jersey City, NJ, as the associate dean for student services. She has since risen through the ranks, holding three different vice presidencies, including her current role as senior vice president for student and educational services.

“I am thrilled and humbled to have the opportunity to lead Reynolds Community College as it approaches its half-century mark of providing the Richmond area outstanding educational opportunities, and to join the forward-thinking community college system that is the VCCS,” Pando said.

In 2017, Pando was among 38 leaders from across the country selected for the Aspen Presidential Fellowship for Community College Excellence, a rigorous 10 month applied leadership program. Pando holds a doctorate from Rowan University in Glassboro, NJ; a master’s degree from Saint Peter’s University in Jersey City, NJ; and bachelor’s degree from Stockton University in Pomona, NJ.

“Reynolds was blessed to receive an array of well-qualified candidates interested in serving as the next president of the college. This made our job very difficult. We selected a person who we believe is extremely well-qualified,” said Stephen E. Baril, chair of the Reynolds Community College local board. “She received outstanding reviews from faculty, staff, community leaders, and the College Board. We are delighted that Dr. Paula Pando has accepted our offer to be the next president of our college.”

Pando will become the college’s fourth president, succeeding Dr. Gary Rhodes, who will retire on September 1 after serving in that role for 16 years.

Serving more than 16,000 students annually, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College is the youngest and among the largest of 23 community colleges in Virginia. The college operates three campuses serving residents in the City of Richmond and the counties of Henrico, Hanover, Goochland, Powhatan and Louisa.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND – Dr. Glenn DuBois, the chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that he is appointing an interim president to lead Tidewater Community College following the retirement of its current president at the beginning of July.

[caption id="attachment_28194" align="alignright" width="214"] Dr. Gregory T. DeCinque[/caption]

Dr. Gregory T. DeCinque – pronounced dee-SINK-yew – begins work at the beginning of July, 2018. Dr. Edna V. Baehre Kolovani, recently announced her retirement after serving as the college’s president since 2012.

DeCinque has presided over three different community colleges throughout his 44 year career in higher education. He was the acting president of Tunxis Community-Technical College, in Farmington, CT, for more than a year beginning in August 1992. He spent nearly 20 years as the president of Jamestown Community College in New York before retiring in August 2013. In addition, he served for nearly two years as the interim president of Cayuga Community College in Auburn, NY through the summer of 2015.

“Greg DeCinque is a respected and seasoned community college leader,” said DuBois. “I expect him to continue many of the student-focused initiatives underway at TCC, like the guided pathways work that will soon begin its first wave. I’m confident in his ability to unite the college community around the necessary work to increase enrollment, student success, and student completion – and see to it that TCC is the difference-maker that the community needs it to be.”

DeCinque holds a doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin; a master’s degree from New York University; and a bachelor’s degree from Montclair State College.

“I’m extremely honored that Dr. DuBois has offered me an opportunity to work with the Virginia’s Community Colleges and specifically Tidewater Community College,” said DeCinque. “Both the system and the college has a great reputation for providing high quality education and training to the communities that they serve. Both my wife, Laura, and I look forward to meeting the members of the TCC community and all of southern Hampton Roads. I’m excited for the opportunity to implement the guided pathways work that will soon begin, as well as the continued expansion of the workforce training programs the college offers.”

Founded in 1968 as a part of the Virginia Community College System, Tidewater Community College serves South Hampton Roads with four campuses in Chesapeake, Norfolk, Portsmouth and Virginia Beach and 7 regional centers. TCC is the largest provider of higher education and workforce services in Hampton Roads, enrolling more than 34,000 students in 2016-17.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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RICHMOND —The State Board for Community Colleges established the 2018-2019 academic year in-state tuition and mandatory fees rate at $154 per credit hour today at its regular May meeting. Beginning this fall, in-state students will pay an additional $3.75 per credit hour – an increase of 2.5 percent – meaning the cost of a typical three-hour class will increase by $11.25, and the cost of a full-time load of classes for the year will increase by $112.50.

The new rate keeps community college tuition and mandatory fees at approximately one-third of the comparable costs of attending Virginia’s public four-year universities.
Virginia’s Community Colleges will use the tuition increase to pay a share of rising employee fringe benefit costs; strategic enrollment initiatives; costs associated with using various Virginia administrative systems; and facility maintenance and operating costs.

“Today’s decision requires us to find the balance necessary to advance two different priorities,” said Eleanor Saslaw, chair of the Virginia State Board for Community Colleges. “College affordability remains essential to the community college mission, and we’ve honored that. Meanwhile, resources are needed to increase student advising and other essential initiatives, like those identified in last fall’s JLARC report on our colleges, to help more students succeed and complete their programs of study. I believe we are honoring those needs too.”

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION
The State Board increased the tuition rate for out-of-state students by $3.75 per credit hour to a total of $351.60 per credit hour.
Out-of-state students make up approximately five percent of the total enrollment of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

TUITION DIFFERENTIALS
There were no differential tuition increase requests for fall 2018, meaning that the tuition differential rates remain unchanged from last year for the eight colleges that implement them (Germanna, John Tyler, Northern Virginia, Piedmont Virginia, Reynolds, Tidewater, Thomas Nelson, and Virginia Western).

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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Glenn DuBois, the Chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges made the following statement today on the announced retirement of Tidewater Community College President Edna V. Baehre-Kolovani:

“I have known Edna Baehre-Kolovani since we were colleagues at Genesee Community College, in New York, in 1990. You will not find a harder worker, a more passionate advocate for our mission, nor a more talented fundraiser anywhere in community college education. Edna’s announcement today caps an impressive, 36-year career in which she has changed lives and strengthened communities everywhere she has worked. She should be proud.

“I congratulate Edna on a well-earned retirement and am glad to know that she and her husband will continue to call Virginia home.”

“We will soon announce an interim president for TCC. Later, we will conduct a national search for the college’s next permanent president.

“Meanwhile, I expect the college to continue forward with initiatives like the college’s pathway work, which will launch its first wave this summer, and other key efforts aimed at increasing enrollment, student success, and completion. There is too much to gain from these priorities for them to be lost in transition.

“Our external partners should know that the college remains committed to the projects upon which its major gifts campaign is focused. That campaign’s strong beginning is encouraging.

“Declining enrollment is challenging TCC – a college that is too big, and much too important, for that trend to continue. We must turn it around, and I am confident that we will. By leveraging the talents of our faculty and staff, improving communications and inclusion, and focusing on our mission, we will find the institutional success to which we all aspire.”

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